Diagnostic Medical Imaging: How, Why, and When

  • Jack O. Haller
  • Thomas L. Slovis

Abstract

Diagnostic medical imaging can be accomplished in many ways using various physical tools. X-rays (gamma rays) create the images seen on plain films, fluoroscopy, angiography, and routine tomography. A tomogram is an image of a thin section, a small piece of the whole organ, demonstrated with increased resolution and detail. Gamma rays are also used in nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography (PET). Sound waves create the information necessary to make an ultrasound image while magnetic fields provide the data for an image in a magnetic resonance (MR) examination. The proliferation of imaging modalities for diagnostic evaluation is predicated on the emergence of the computer. It is the vital cog for acquisition and processing of the data and/or the manipulation after processing (postprocessing). Reconstruction of images in many planes and three-dimensional rendering of the anatomy are among the most valuable options offered by postprocessing (Fig. 1.1). Use of computers for storing and moving images is rapidly evolving.

Keywords

Tungsten Radionuclide Barium Expense Gall 

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References

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    Curry TS III, Dowdey JE, Murray RC Jr. (1990) Christensen’s physics of diagnostic radiology, 4th edn. Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, 1990Google Scholar
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    National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (1983) Biological effects of ultrasound: mechanisms and clinical implications. NCRP report 74. Washington, National Council on Radiation Protection and MeasurementsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack O. Haller
    • 1
  • Thomas L. Slovis
    • 2
  1. 1.Health Science Center at Brooklyn, Kings County Hospital, Downstate Medical CenterState University of New YorkBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.Childrens Hospital of MichiganWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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