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Cryopreservation and Minimum Growth Storage of Pear (Pyrus Species)

  • T. Moriguchi
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 32)

Abstract

Pear (genus Pyrus) belongs to the family Rosaceae. It is believed to have arisen during the Tertiary period in the mountainous regions of western China. Dispersal followed the mountain chains towards both the east and west. In the west, two secondary centers, where many populations are differentiated, are formed. The central Asiatic region includes Tadjikistan, Uzbekistan, India, Afghanistan, and the Tian-Shai Mts. In this region, a crossing of Pyrus communis with P. heterophylla, P. boissieriana, or P. korshinskyi has been carried out. Another dispersal area is the near-eastern region including the Caucasus Mts. and Asia Minor. Domesticated forms of P. communis are believed to have originated in the near-eastern regions. In the east, a secondary center (Chinese center) is the continent of China, where Asian pears are believed to have developed (Asian pea pears and Asian large-fruited pears) (Vavilov 1951).

Keywords

Shoot Apex Shoot Formation Pear Fruit Continuous Darkness Japanese Pear 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Moriguchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of BreedingFruit Tree Research StationTsukuba, Ibaraki, 305Japan

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