The Human Component of System Validation

  • P. G. A. M. Jorna
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 110)

Abstract

In the last decade, much experience was gained with respect to human factors aspects of operating complex systems like advanced military and civil aircraft. The rapid development and application of technology initiated two opposite trends. The first trend is related to progressive automation and the problem of underload or complacency for the operator, while the second trend is associated with the increased mission capabilities of systems like military aircraft and the problem of “moding” and overloading humans with information. In both cases, human performance is critical for the system, but workload levels have to be regarded as being inadequate for optimal performance, safety, or endurance of the pilots involved. A recent and urgent problem area is the redesign of the air traffic control system in order to meet the expected traffic demands of the future. Even with the present traffic there is a need for an improved system, but the predicted demand is estimated to double the present one. The accident rate alone should be halved to maintain the status quo on the total number of casualties involved in air transportation. A highly significant challenge is posed to both system engineers and human factors people, as human failure is a major accident or mishap factor.

Keywords

Fatigue Microwave Transportation Expense Hull 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. A. M. Jorna
    • 1
  1. 1.National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR)AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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