Characterization of Catalysts by Surface Analysis

  • B. G. Baker
Part of the Springer Series in Surface Sciences book series (SSSUR, volume 23)

Abstract

Solid catalysts are the basis of many important industrial processes. Reaction of gases or liquids to form particular products occurs at specific sites on the catalyst surface. The structure and composition of the catalyst surface is critical in determining the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst. The techniques of surface analysis provide the means of characterizing a catalyst in terms of the actual composition and structure of the surface rather than by its bulk properties. The objective of such studies is to provide a scientific basis for improving catalyst formulations and understanding the processes of activation and deactivation which the catalyst undergoes. Supported catalysts, the type most widely used in industry, consist of an active component dispersed on the internal surface of a porous inorganic oxide. High area solids and light loadings very highly dispersed are often employed to maximize the catalytic activity of expensive components. Metals and oxides may be formed on a support by decomposing or reducing a salt which has been introduced by solution impregnation. The preparation pretreated and actual catalytic reaction conditions may result in reaction between the components including the support. It is the purpose of the surface analysis to reveal these processes.

Keywords

Titania Magnesium Argon Cobalt Catalysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

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  • B. G. Baker

There are no affiliations available

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