Introduction

  • Nobuo Tsuda
  • Keiichiro Nasu
  • Akira Yanase
  • Kiiti Siratori
Part of the Springer Series in Solid-State Sciences book series (SSSOL, volume 94)

Abstract

The surface of the earth is almost entirely composed of oxides. Over the centuries much effort has been expended to reduce these oxides to metals such as aluminium, copper, and iron. Metals can carry an electric current and are ductile, whereas oxides have generally been considered to be insulating and brittle. They remain brittle even at room temperature, except for a certain specially fabricated zirconium oxide. However as far as their electrical properties are concerned, there are actually many good conductors and in fact thallium-copper oxide shows superconductivity at temperatures as high as 125 K.

Keywords

Zirconium Brittle Perovskite 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.1
    C. Kittel: Introduction to Solid State Physics, 6th ed. ( Wiley, New York 1986 )Google Scholar
  2. 1.2
    J.B. Goodenough: In Progress in Solid State Chemistry, Vol.5, ed. by H. Reiss ( Pergamon, London 1971 ) p. 145Google Scholar
  3. 1.3
    A. Laskar, S. Chandra (eds.): Superionic Solids and Solid Electrolytes (Academic, New York 1989 )Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuo Tsuda
    • 1
  • Keiichiro Nasu
    • 2
  • Akira Yanase
    • 3
  • Kiiti Siratori
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of ScienceScience University of TokyoTokyo 162Japan
  2. 2.Institute for Molecular ScienceGraduate University for Advanced StudiesOkazaki 444Japan
  3. 3.College of Integrated Arts and ScienceUniversity of Osaka PrefectureSakai 591Japan
  4. 4.Department of Physics, Faculty of ScienceOsaka UniversityToyonaka 560Japan

Personalised recommendations