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Rectal Prolapse, Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome, Descending Perineal Syndrome

  • E. Gemsenjäger
Conference paper

Abstract

Rectal prolapse or procidentia is an invagination or an extrusion of the entire thickness of rectal wall into or through the anal canal. The prolapse may start at the anal verge, at the anorectal ring, or at a higher level, representing an intussusception or invagination of the anterior, the posterior, or the whole circumference of the rectal wall into the rectum or into the anal canal. The various degrees of circumferential involvement, rectal wall descent, and ex-trusion result in a multifaceted clinical appearance.

Keywords

Pelvic Floor Anal Canal Pelvic Floor Muscle Rectal Prolapse Rectal Wall 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Gemsenjäger

There are no affiliations available

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