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The Macroeconomic Models of the European CMEA Countries

  • Rumen Dobrinsky

Summary

Some specific features of the models of the European CMEA countries are described in this chapter. Three main aspects of the models are discussed: the production technology, the structure of production, and the distribution of the final product. The empirical findings concerning these aspects of the models are presented, as well as an analysis of the dynamic properties of the model as a whole.

Keywords

Real Wage Mean Absolute Percentage Error Socialist Economy Consumption Demand Price Deflator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rumen Dobrinsky

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