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The Evaluation of Sedimentary Basins for Massive Sulfide Mineralization

  • D. Large
Part of the Special Publication of the Society for Geology Applied to Mineral Deposits book series (MINERAL DEPOS., volume 5)

Abstract

The geological setting of sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits is reviewed in the light of new concepts on the evolution of sedimentary basins. It is shown that the sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits are hosted by extensional basins and were formed during the post-rift phase of thermal subsidence. The mineralization event is associated with a distinct tensional pulse that is superimposed on the regional thermal subsidence of the basin and can be recognized in the stratigraphy by locally developed sedimentological indications of rapid subsidence. Basin analysis can be used to identify prospective basins and the target stratigraphy in the preliminary analysis of sedimentary sequences for sediment-hosted massive sulfide mineralization.

Keywords

Sedimentary Basin Massive Sulfide Foreland Basin Sedimentary Facies Rapid Subsidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Large
    • 1
  1. 1.BraunschweigWest Germany

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