The Coping Function of Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Use

  • E. W. Labouvie

Abstract

It is widely accepted by both the lay public and scientific experts (e.g., Freed, 1978; Lettieri, 1978; Pandina, 1982) that individuals often rely on alcohol and/or drugs to manage and control the subjective experience of their internal affective states. These states are assumed to include both moods and emotions. Presumably, moods are more general and diffuse, representing central tendencies in affect and motivation with some degree of continuity and stability over time and situations. In comparison, emotions are more specific, more discontinuous, and less stable (Ketai, 1975; Lazarus, Kanner, & Folkman, 1980). Furthermore, it is generally believed that the self-regulation of subjectively experienced, affective states represents an important aspect of an individual’s attempts to cope with, and adapt to, the environment (Breger, 1974).

Keywords

Crystallization Tate Clarification Cohol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. W. Labouvie
    • 1
  1. 1.Health and Human Development ProjectRutgers-The State University of New JerseyPiscatawayUSA

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