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D-Glucose Transport in Oncogenic Transformation

Conference paper
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Abstract

When mouse embryonic fibroblasts were infected with a mouse sarcoma virus, the enhanced glucose uptake was observed by the transformed cells (Hatanaka et a1.1969).

Keywords

Sugar Transport Sugar Uptake Oncogenic Transformation Rous Sarcoma Virus Chicken Embryo Fibroblast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

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