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Some Tumour Markers in Malignant and Non-Malignant Hybrid Cells

Conference paper
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Abstract

The use of positron emission tomography is of great potential in the detection of tumors. This report reviews recent studies on particular physiological and biochemical markers that appear to have a good correlation with the malignant phenotype.

Keywords

Sialic Acid Cell Fusion Hybrid Cell Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Glucose Starvation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

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