Ecological Relations (Allelochemicals)

  • Martin Luckner

Abstract

Microorganisms, plants and animals live in a world of chemical signals. These signals, in most cases secondary products, are of special importance in ecology, i.e., the mutual relations between the different groups of organisms, which cause the formation of the characteristic communities of living beings in the forests, meadows, and deserts, in pools, rivers and the open sea, in coral riffs, ant hills, etc. In these communities many kinds of microorganisms, plants and animals promote and inhibit each other in a delicate belance. In a process called coevolu-tion step-by-step signal and target mechanisms emerged, mechanisms of response, adaptation, dependence and mimicry developed resulting in a complex network of relations interlinking the organisms of a habitat.

Keywords

Flavonoid Carotenoid Glycoside Cassava Rotenone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Luckner
    • 1
  1. 1.Sektion PharmazieMartin-Luther-UniversitätHalle-WittenbergDeutschland

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