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Cellular Compartmentalization and Channeling

  • Martin Luckner

Abstract

The spatial organization of cells and organelles is an important feature in the regulation of metabolism. It is the basis for the compartmentalization of enzymes and the channeling of precursors, intermediates, and products to the sites of metabolic activity. At the cellular level it is brought about either by membranes separating cytoplasmic and noncytoplasmic areas or by the influence of micro environmental effects which form “microcompartments” within the cell, e.g., by mutual binding of proteins, location of enzymes near each other in membranes, and by so-called unstirred layer effects. These structural characters give rise to high local concentrations of reactants, the protection of reactive intermediates and the directed transport of precursors, intermediates, and products. They favor certain sequences of reactions (metabolic channeling) and thus facilitate the formation and function of metabolic chains.

Keywords

Secondary Metabolism Cinnamic Acid Secondary Product Tropane Alkaloid Cyanogenic Glycoside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References for Further Reading

  1. Conn, E. E.: Cyanogenic glycosides. In: Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, New Series, Vol. 8, Secondary Plant Products (E. A. Bell, B. V. Charlwood, eds.), pp. 461–492, Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York 1980Google Scholar
  2. Kindl, H.: Compartments and microcompartments channelling intermediates in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In: Proc. 12th FEBS Meeting, Vol. 55; Regulation of Secondary Product and Plant Hormone Metabolism (M. Luckner, K. Schreiber, eds.), pp. 49–61, Pergamon Press, Oxford 1979Google Scholar
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References for Further Reading (see also A 3.3)

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References for Further Reading

  1. Givan, C. V., Harwood, J. L.: Biosynthesis of small molecules in chloroplasts of higher plants. Biol. Rev. 51, 365–406 (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Luckner, M.: Expression and control of secondary metabolism. In: Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology, New Series, Vol. 8. Secondary Plant Products (E. A. Bell, B. V. Charlwood, eds.), pp. 23–63. Springer, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York 1980Google Scholar
  3. Luckner, M., Diettrich, B., Lerbs, W.: Cellular compartmentation and channelling of secondary metabolism in microorganisms and higher plants. Prog. Phytochem. 6, 103–142 (1980)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Luckner
    • 1
  1. 1.Sektion PharmazieMartin-Luther-UniversitätHalle-WittenbergDeutschland

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