Advertisement

NDE Technique for Detection and Characterization of Porosity

  • D. O. Thompson
  • S. J. Wormley
  • James H. Rose
  • R. B. Thompson
Conference paper

Abstract

The purpose of the work described in this paper is the development of an ultrasonic measurement technique which provides a convenient way to detect dilute porosity conditions in materials and to extract certain properties of the flaw distribution which are important in failure prediction. Use has been made entirely of ultrasonic backscatter measurements; thus, the technique differs considerably from other investigations which lead to porosity determinations in that no reliance is placed upon either attenuation measurements or precise ultrasonic velocity measurements [1,2]. The technique thus possesses a distinct advantage for practical implementation, i.e., it is a “one-sided” measurement which does not require ultrasonic echo returns from an opposite face of the sample in order to be useful. At present, the work is limited to dilute porosity concentrations. Reasons for this limitation will become clear in the paper. With additional effort it is expected that this limitation can be removed and the work extended to larger concentrations.

Keywords

Ultrasonic Measurement Failure Prediction Void Distribution Void Diameter Single Void 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    K. Goebbels, in, Research Techniques in Nondestructive Testing, Ed. R. S. Sharpe, Academic Press, 4, 87 (1980).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. G. Evans, G. S. Kino, B. T. Khuri-Yakub and B. R. Tittmann, Materials Evaluation 35, 85 (1977).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. O. Thompson, S. J. Wormley, J. H. Rose and R. B. Thompson, “Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE”, Plenum Press, 1982, to be published.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    C. F. Ying and R. Truell, J. Appl. Phys. 27, 1086 (1956).MathSciNetMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. E. Gubernatis, E. Domany and J. A. Krumhansl, J. Appl. Phys. 48, 2804 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    A. K. Mal and L. Knopoff, J. Inst. Math. Its Appli. 3, 376 (1967).MATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    See, for example, R. K. Elsley, J. M. Richardson, R. B. Thompson and B. R. Tittmann, in, Acoustic, Electromagnetic and Elastic Wave Scattering, Eds. V. V. Varadan and V. K. Varadan, Pergamon Press, p. 571–589, esp. 576 (1980).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. O. Thompson
    • 1
  • S. J. Wormley
    • 1
  • James H. Rose
    • 1
  • R. B. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Ames LaboratoryUSDOE, Iowa State UniversityAmesUSA

Personalised recommendations