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Polydiagnost-N

An Isocentric Parallelogram for Obtaining Orthogonal Magnified Cerebral Angiograms Routinely
  • A. E. Rosenbaum
  • J. K. Grady
  • D. B. Rice
  • J. W. Langston
Conference paper

Abstract

“In vivo” radiography of vessels subserving the brain can be relatively facile because of the unusual radiographic characteristics of this region, the rounded shape of the skull, relatively uniform thickness of the encompassing cranial vault, and confined low amplitude motion of the cerebral vessels. The principle of single tube concentric and isocentric radiographic positioning for plain skull and pneumoencephalographic examinations 1–7 has only recently been fully applied to cerebral angiography°. Technologic deficiencies precluded the application of integrated movement design for cerebral angiographic radiography previously:
  1. 1.

    The design of cerebral angiographic equipment had not sufficiently progressed to consider reducing the needless manual requirements of the radiologic technologist for realigning tubes and changers about the patient continuously.

     
  2. 2.

    Lack of a light weight, reliable, satisfactory detail serial film changer.

     
  3. 3.

    Even recently developed concentric (Mimer °°, Princeps °°°, Neurocentrix °°°) and isocentric (Neurodiagnost °°°°) pneumoencephalographic systems which allow for cerebral angiography use a mechanized C-arm or ring rotational movements. These movements do not provide cephalo — caudal tube projections onto an orthogonally positioned changer while obtaining compound angulations.

     

Keywords

Cerebral Angiography Radiologic Technologist Frontal Projection Electromagnetic Brake Compound Angle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Rosenbaum
  • J. K. Grady
  • D. B. Rice
  • J. W. Langston

There are no affiliations available

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