Tree Defense Mechanisms Against Fungi Associated with Insects

  • K. F. Raffa
  • K. D. Klepzig
Part of the Springer Series in Wood Science book series (SSWOO)

Abstract

Insect-vectored fungi cause some of the most serious problems facing tree protection. For example, bark beetles are typically listed as the foremost tree-killing agents in government surveys, but in fact these insects are intimately associated with fungal symbionts. From both an ecological and a physiological perspective, they are a complex. Likewise, root-feeding beetles and their associated black-staining fungi are becoming increasingly important as the conversion to plantation forestry intensifies. Insect-vectored fungi also cause severe losses to high-value urban trees, such as with Dutch elm disease.

Keywords

Cellulose Fermentation Starch Phenol Carbohydrate 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. F. Raffa
  • K. D. Klepzig

There are no affiliations available

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