Anatomical and Physiological Aspects of Resistance to Dutch Elm Disease

  • G. B. Ouellette
  • D. Rioux
Part of the Springer Series in Wood Science book series (SSWOO)

Abstract

Most elm species (Ulmus spp.), considered by many to be the most beautiful urban trees, are well adapted to the numerous stressful conditions in cities. Their major shortcoming, however, is their susceptibility to Dutch elm disease (DED). Although millions of elms have died since the first observation of DED about 70 years ago in Europe, they are not verging on extinction because they have a great capacity for regeneration, which explains why large elms affected by DED in woodland areas are gradually replaced by younger and smaller elm trees.

Keywords

Phenol Enzymatic Degradation Lime Tryptophan Cellulase 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

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  • G. B. Ouellette
  • D. Rioux

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