The Autonomic Nervous System

  • W. Jänig
Part of the Springer Study Edition book series (SSE)

Abstract

The organism communicates with its environment by means of its somatic nervous system: the sensory system receives and processes information from the environment (see Chapter 1 and Fundamentals of Sensory Physiology), and the motor system provides the means for getting about in the environment (see Chapters 4, 6, and 7). The processes in the somatic nervous system are subject, for the most part, to conscious and voluntary control.

Keywords

Mercury Propa Respiration Acidity Immobilization 

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General Literature

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Jänig

There are no affiliations available

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