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Disturbance and Recovery of Arctic Alaskan Vegetation

  • D. A. Walker
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 120)

Abstract

The discovery of oil at Prudhoe Bay in 1968 prompted considerable interest and funding for disturbance research in arctic ecosystems. Most of the early studies focused on small-scale disturbances relating to oil spills, off-road vehicle trails, roadside disturbances, and old oil-well sites. During the late 1980s and 1990s, scientific interest turned to the broader-scale issues relating to the basic ecosystem processes involved in disturbance and recovery (Oechel 1989; Chaps. 1 and 2, this Vol.), cumulative impacts of large oil-field developments (Walker et al. 1987a), restoration of affected areas (Wyant and Knapp 1992), effects of contamination of the arctic atmosphere from sources at lower latitudes (Landers et al. 1992), and issues relating to climate change (Chapin et al. 1992).

Keywords

Road Dust North Slope Tussock Tundra Seward Peninsula Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

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  • D. A. Walker

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