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Integrated Ecosystem Research in Northern Alaska, 1947–1994

  • G. R. Shaver
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 120)

Abstract

Current research on human impacts in tundra ecosystems and landscapes builds upon a rich history of basic ecological studies carried out in Alaska since World War II. This chapter traces that history from 1947 to 1994, showing how the major ecological ideas and research themes have evolved within the community of arctic ecologists. The central hypotheses of the research described in the rest of this book are in many ways a product of this evolution, and this book represents the most recent synthesis of our understanding.

Keywords

Arctic Tundra Arctic Ecosystem Tundra Ecosystem Toolik Lake Plant Growth Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

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  • G. R. Shaver

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