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Modeling Decomposition in Arctic Ecosystems

  • D. L. Moorhead
  • J. F. Reynolds
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 120)

Abstract

Shifting climatic regimes (Maxwell 1992) and localized impacts of human activities (Chap. 4, this Vol.) are likely to have substantial effects on Arctic ecosystems (Chapin et al. 1992; Chapin and Körner 1995; Oechel, in prep.). Numerous speculations and predictions have been made of the potential response of arctic plants and ecosystems to changes in temperature, season length, moisture availability, and CO2 concentration (reviewed in Chapin et al. 1992; Chapin and Körner 1995). Nevertheless, plant responses in these ecosystems are generally constrained by low nutrient availability (Shaver and Chapin 1986; Chap. 11, this Vol.), and environmental changes may have little impact on plant productivity unless average nutrient availability also changes (Leadley and Reynolds 1992; Reynolds and Leadley 1992). Thus, it is essential to predict how environmental changes alter decomposition and nutrient availability. In this chapter, we review simulation models for describing decomposition in arctic soils and consider potential effects of climate change, elevated CO2, and road dust deposition on decomposition and nutrient dynamics in tundra ecosystems.

Keywords

Arctic Ecosystem Tundra Ecosystem Arctic Soil Toolik Lake Tussock Tundra 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. L. Moorhead
  • J. F. Reynolds

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