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HPLC with Thermospray Mass Spectrometry

  • Dietrich Volmer
  • Karsten Levsen
Part of the Chemistry of Plant Protection book series (PLANT PROTECTIO, volume 12)

Abstract

On-line coupling HPLC — MS via a thermospray interface is the preferred alternative among HPLC — MS ionization techniques for pesticide trace analysis of (aquatic) environmental samples. After a discussion of the theoretical principles for ionization of molecules capable of producing suitable signals, many of the factors influencing instrumental performance are explained. Referring to reports from the literature, but mostly by means of our experience with experimental methods, nearly 150 pesticides are dealt with. By optimization of the parameters which affect the sensitivity and the specifity the best results for most of the various pesticides may be achieved, so that the legislative demands for water protection can be fulfilled. The special value of the HPLC — MS technique lies in the field of structural information and confirmation. Here tandem MS technique, postcolumn addition of additives, enhanced positive and negative ion generation among others may be useful for application down to the sub-nanogram per liter level.

Keywords

Buffer Ionization Carrier Stream Phenoxy Acid Postcolumn Addition Aldicarb Sulfone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietrich Volmer
    • 1
  • Karsten Levsen
    • 2
  1. 1.US Food and Drug AdministrationNational Center for Toxicological ResearchJeffersonUSA
  2. 2.Fraunhofer Institut für Toxikologie und AerosolforschungHannoverGermany

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