Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literatur

  1. Aarden, L.A., Burner, T.K., Cerottini, J.C., Dayer, J.M., de Weck, A.L., Dinarello, C.A., Di Sabato, G., Farrar, J.J., Gery, I., Gillis, S., Handschumacher, R.E., Henney, C.S., Hoffmann, M.K., Koopman, W.J., Karane, S.M., Lachman, L.B., Lefkowits, I., Mishell, Mizel, S.B., Oppenheim, J.J., Paetkan, V., Plate, J., Rollinghoff, M., Rosenstreich, D., Rosenthal, A.S., Rosenwasser, L.J., Schimpl, A., Shin, H.S., Simon, P.L., Smith, K.A., Wagner, H., Watson, J.D., Wecker, E., Wood, D.D.: Letter to the editor. Revised nomenclature for antigen non-specific T-cell proliferation and helper factors. J. Immunol. 123, 2928–2929 (1979)Google Scholar
  2. Aasen, A.O., Kierulf, P., Vaage, J., Godal, H.C., Anne, S.: Determination of components of the plasma proteolytic enzyme systems gives information of prognostic value in patients with multiple trauma. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 1037–1047 (1983)Google Scholar
  3. Abiodun, Ph., Bauer, M., Wolf, H., Hug, G.: Alpha-l -Antitrypsinmangel im Kindesalter. Med. Welt 32, 245–249 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Ackermann, N., Jubb, S., Trimble, B., Yoxall, B.: Release of cartilage proteoglycan degrading enzyme activity by thioglycollate stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in culture. Agents Actions 9, 488–496 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Adams, D.O.: The granulomatous inflammatory response. A review. Amer J Path 84, 164–191 (1976)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Adams, D.O.: Macrophage activation and secretion. Fed. Proc. 41, 2193–2197 (1982)Google Scholar
  7. Adams, D.O., Marino, P.A.: Evidence for a multistep mechanism of cytolysis by BCG-activated macrophages: The interrelationship between the capacity for cytolysis, target binding, and secretion of cytolytic factor. J Immunol 126, 981–987 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Adams, D.O., Johnson, J., Marino, P.A.: Mechanisms of target recognition and destruction in macrophage-mediated tumor cytotoxicity. Fed. Proc. 41, 2212–2221 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Adelman, N.E., Hammond, M.E., Cohen, S., Dvorak, H.F.: Lymphokines as inflammatory mediators. In: Cohen, S., Pick, E., Oppenheim, J.J.: Biology of the lymphokines. Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, London, 13–58 (1979)Google Scholar
  10. Alexander, S.A., Donoff, R.B.: The glycosaminoglykans of open wounds. J. Surg. Res. 29, 422–429 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Allison, A.C., Ferluga, Y., Prydz, H., Schorlemmer, U.: The role of macrophage activation in chronic inflammation. Agents Actions 8, 27–35 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Alm, P.E., Bloom, G.D.: Minireview: Cyclic nucleotide involvement in histamin release from mast cells — A reevaluation. Life Sciences 30, 213–218 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Altman, L.C.: Chemotactic lymphokines: A review. In: Gallin, J.I., Quie, G. Leukocyte chemotaxis, Raven Press, New York, 267–287 (1978)Google Scholar
  14. Apte, R.N., Heller, E., Hertogs, C.F., Pluznik, D.H.: Macrophages as regulators of granulopoiesis. In: Escobar, M.R., Friedman, H., Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology Macrophages and Lymphocytes Part A, Nature, Functions and Interaction, Plenum Press New York and London, 433–449 (1980)Google Scholar
  15. Aswanikumar, E., Schiffmann, E., Corcoran, B.A., Wahl, S.M.: Role of a peptidase in phagocyte chemotaxis. In: Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 73, 2439–2442 (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Athens, J.W., Haab, O.P., Raab, S.O., Mauer, A.N., Ashenbrucker, H., Cortwright, G.E., Wintrobe, N.N.: Leukokinetic Studies. IV. The total blood, circulating and marginal granulocyte pools and the granulocyte turnover rate in normal subjects. J. Clin. Invest. 40, 989–995 (1961)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Atkins, E., Askenase, P.W., Francis, L., Bernheim, H.A.: Release of an endogenous pyrogen from guinea pig leukocytes: The role of T-lymphocytes and correlation with suppression (desensitization) of delayed hypersensitivity. J. Immunol. 125, 2069–2075 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Auerbach, R.: Angiogenesis-inducing factors: A review. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4, Academic Press, New York, 69–88 (1981)Google Scholar
  19. Babior, B.M.: Oxygen-dependent microbial killing by phagocytes I. N. Engl. J. Med. 298, 659–668 (1978a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Babior, B.M.: Oxygen-dependent microbial killing by phagocytes II. In: N. Engl. J. Med. 298, 721–725 (1978b)Google Scholar
  21. Badenoch-Jones, P.: Production of the lymphokine, macrophage aggregating factor, is not inhibited by histamine. Experientia 38, 1230–1231 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Baenkler, H.W.: Umwelt und Immunsystem. Dtsch. med. Wschr. 110, 312–315 (1985)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Bagby Jr., G.C., Mc Call, E., Laymann, D.L.: Regulation of colony-stimulating activity production. Interaction of fibroblasts, mononuclear phagocytes and lactoferrin. J. Clin. Invest. 71, 340–344 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Baggiolini, M., Dewald, B.: Exocytosis by neutrophils. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York and London, 221–246 (1984)Google Scholar
  25. Baggiolini, M, Bretz, U., Dewald, B., Feigenson, M.E.: The polymorphonuclear leukocyte. Agents Actions 8, 3–10 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Baggiolini, M., Schnyder, J., Bretz, U.: Lysosomal enzymes and neutral proteinases as mediators of inflammation. In: Weismann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R. Advances in Inflammation Research I. Raven Press, New York, pp. 263–272 (1979)Google Scholar
  27. Bainton, D.F.: Changes in peroxidase distribution within organelles of blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages after surface adherence in vitro and in vivo. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The HagueBoston-London, 61–86 (1980)Google Scholar
  28. Barrett, A.J.: The possible role of neutrophil proteinases in damage to articular cartilage. Agents Actions 8, 11–18 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Baum, S.J.: Negative and positive feedback control of the committed granulocytic stem cell compartment. In: Baum, S.J., Ledney, G.D., Experimental Hematology Today. Springer Verlag, New York, Heidelberg, Berlin, 127–134 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Beatty, K., Bieth, J., Travis, J.: Kinetics of association of serine-proteinases with native and oxidized Alpha-l-Proteinase Inhibitor and Alpha-1-Antichymotrypsin. J. Biol. Chem. 255, 3931–3934 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Beaven, M.A.: Histamine Part I. N. Engl. J. Med. 294, 30–36 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Becker, E.L.: Enzyme activation and the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. Antibiotics and Chemotherapy 19, 409–420 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. Becker, E.L.: A multifunctional receptor on the neutrophil for synthetic chemotactic oligopeptides. J Reticuloendothel. Soc. 26, 701–709 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Becker, E.L., Showell, H.J., Henson, P.N., Hsu, L.S.: The ability of chemotactic factors to induce lysosomal enzyme release. 1. The characteristics of the release, the importance of surfaces and the relation of enzyme release to chemotactic responsiveness. J. Immunol. 112, 2047–2054 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Becker, E.L., Showell, H.J., Naccache, P.H., Shaafi, R.: Enzymes in granulocyte movement: Preliminary evidence for the involvement of Nat, K+-ATPase. In: Gallin, J.I.: Quic, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis, Raven Press, New York, 113–121 (1978)Google Scholar
  36. Becker, E.L., Naccache, P.H., Showell, H.J., Walenga, R.W.: Early events in neutrophil activation: Receptor stimulation, ionic fluxes, and arachidonic acid metabolism. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, 297–333 (1981)Google Scholar
  37. Beelen, R.H.J., Fluitsma, D.M., Meer, J.W.M. van der, Hoefsmit, E.C.M.: Development of exsudate-resident macrophages on the basis of the pattern of peroxidatic activity in vivo and in vitro. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes I, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 87–112 (1980)Google Scholar
  38. Beer, D.J., Osband, M.E., Mc Caffrey, R.M., Soter, N.A., Rocklin, R.E.: Abnormal histamine- induced suppressor-cell function in atopic subjects. N. Engl. J. Med. 306, 454–458 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Beller, D.I., Unanue, E.R.: Ia-Antigens and antigen-presenting function of thymic macrophages. J. Immunol. 124, 1433–1440 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Beller, D.I., Kiely, J.-M., Unanue, E.R.: Regulation of macrophage populations. I. Preferential induction of la-rich peritoneal exsudates by immunologic stimuli. J. Immunol. 124, 1426–1432 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  41. Bentley, C., Zimmer, B., Hadding, U.: The macrophage as a source of complement components. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, 197–230 (1981)Google Scholar
  42. Bernheim, H.A., Block, L.H., Atkins, E.: Fever: Pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and purpose. Ann. Int. Med. 91, 261–270 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Berry, L.J.: Pathogenesis of atoxinogenic strains of gram-negative bacteria — a hypothesis. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 693–695 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Bianco, C., Edelson, P.J.: Plasma membrane expressions of macrophage differentiation. In: Lerner, R.A., Bergsma, D., The molecular Basis of Cell-cell Interaction, Birth Defects: Original Article Series XIV. The National Foundation, 119–124 (1978)Google Scholar
  45. Bianco, C., Götze, O., Cohn, Z.A.: Regulation of macrophage migration by products of the complement system. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 888–891 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Bianco, C., Götze, O., Cohn, Z.A.: Complement, coagulation and mononuclear phagocytes. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes Functional Aspects Il. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. The Hague-Boston-London, 1443–1458 (1980)Google Scholar
  47. Bick, R.L.: Clinical relevance of antithrombin III. Sem. Thromb. Hemost. 8, 276–287 (1982a)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Bick, R.L.: The clinical significance of fibrinogen degradation products. Sem. Thromb. Hemost. 8, 302–330 (1982b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Biesecker, G., Müller-Eberhard, H.J.: The ninth component of human complement: Purification and physicochemical characterizations. J. Immunol. 124, 1291–1296 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  50. Billingham, E.J., Gordon, A.H.: The role of the acute phase reaction in inflammation. Agents Actions 6, 195–199 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Bitter-Suermann, D.: Die Funktionseinheit Makrophage—Komplement. Verh. Dtsch. Ges. Path. 64, 63–76 (1980)Google Scholar
  52. Bitter-Suermann, D.: Das Komplementsystem: Physiologische Funktion und klinische Bedeutung. In: Deutsches Ärzteblatt Ausgabe B, 51/52, 33–48 (1983)Google Scholar
  53. Björk, H., Lindahl, U.: Mechanism of the anticoagulant action of heparin. Mol. Cell. Biochem. 48, 161–182 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Blackwood, L.L., Stone, R.M., Iglewski, B.H., Pennington, J.E.: Evaluation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and elastase as virulence factors in acute lung infection. Infect. Immun. 39, 198–201 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. Blasini, Ch., Glas, K., Blasini, R., Haas, S., Wriedt-Lübbe, I., Blümel, G.: Untersuchung über die gewebeständige Plasminogenaktivator-und Plasmininhibitoraktivität von Gelenkkapseln bei verschiedenen Gelenkerkrankungen. Z. Orthop. 119, 455–462 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Block, L.H.: Interaktion zwischen dem Immunsystem und den Faktoren der Koagulation, Fibrinolyse und Inflammation. Munch. med. Wschr. 126, 493–498 (1984)Google Scholar
  57. Block, L.H., Georgopoulos, A.: Faktoren bakterieller Pathogenität. Munch. med. Wschr. 126, 43–48 (1984)Google Scholar
  58. Bloom, B.R.: Interferons and the immune system. Nature 284, 593–595 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Blumberg, A., Denny, S.E., Marshall, G.R., Needleman, P.: Blood vessel—hormone interactions: Angiotensin, bradykinin, and prostaglandin. Am. J. Physiol. 232, 305–310 (1977)Google Scholar
  60. Bokoch, G.M., Boeynaems, J.M., Hubbard, W.C.: Chemotactic and chemokinetic activity of products of mammalian lipoxygenases. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, 271–295 (1981)Google Scholar
  61. Bonney, R.J., Davies, P.: Possible autoregulatory functions of the secretory products of mononuclear phagocytes. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topic in Immunology 13. Plenum Press, New York and London, 199–223 (1984)Google Scholar
  62. Bonney, R.J., Davies, P., Kuehl, F.A., Humes, Y.L.: Arachidonic acid oxygenation products produced by mouse peritoneal macrophages responding to inflammatory stimuli. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 28 Suppl., 113–115 (1980)Google Scholar
  63. Bonta, I.L., Adolfs, M.J.P., Parnham, M.J.: Prostaglandin Ez elevation of cyclic-AMP in granuloma macrophages at various stages of inflammation: Relevance to anti-inflammatory and immunmodulatory functions. Prostaglandins 22, 95–103 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  64. Bonta, I.L., Adolfs, M.J.P., Fieren, M.W.J.A.: Cyclic AMP levels and their regulation by Prostaglandins in peritoneal macrophages of rats and humans. In: Greengard, P., Robinson, G.A., Advances in Cyclic Nucleotide and Protein Phosphorylation Research. Raven Press, New York 17, 615–620 (1984)Google Scholar
  65. Born, G.V.R., Planker, M.: Toward the mechanism of the intravascular adhesion of granulocytes in inflamed vessels. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 117–121 (1979)Google Scholar
  66. Bornstein, D.L.: Leukocytic Pyrogen: A major mediator of the acute phase reaction. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 389, 323–337 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Boros, D.L.: The role of lymphokines in granulomatous inflammation. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3, Academic Press, New York, 257–281 (1981)Google Scholar
  68. Bouma, B.N., Vlooswijk, R.A.A., Griffin, J.H.: Immunological studies of human factor XI and prekallikrein: Demonstration of complex formation with high molecular weight kininogen. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156, 109–113 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  69. Bourne, G.H.: Nutrition and wound healing. In: Glynn, L.E., Houck, J.C., Weissmann, G., Handbook of inflammation 3, Tissue Repair and Regeneration. Elsevier North-Holland, Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, 211–242 (1981)Google Scholar
  70. Boxer, L.A., Hedley-White, E.T., Stossel, T.P.: Neutrophil actin dysfunction and abnormal neutrophil behaviour. N. Engl. J. Med. 291, 1093–1099 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Boxer, L.A., Haak, R.A., Yang, H.-H., Wolach, J.B., Withcomb, J.A., Butlerick, C.J., Baehner, R.L.: Membrane-bound lactoferrin alters the surface properties of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J. Clin. Invest. 70, 1049–1057 (1982a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Boxer, L.A., Coates, T.D., Haak, R.A., Wolach, J.B., Hoffstein, S., Baehner, R.L.: Lactoferrin deficiency associated with altered granulocyte function. N. Engl. J. Med. 307, 404–410 (1982b)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Boyden, S.: Chemotactic effect of mixture of antibody and antigen on polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J. Exp. Med. 115, 453–466 (1962)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Brade, V.: Komplement — Funktion, biologische Bedeutung und klinische Aspekte. Munch. med. Wschr. 121, 1521–1526 (1979)Google Scholar
  75. Brade, V., Bentley, C.: Synthesis and release of complement components by macrophages. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-BostonLondon, 1385–1413 (1980)Google Scholar
  76. Brade, V., Fries, W., Hadding U., Bentley, C.: Synthesis of factors D and B of the alternative pathway, as well as of C3, by guinea pig peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Fed. Proc. 36, 1245 (1977)Google Scholar
  77. Bratanov, K., Mallova, M., Sauleer, B., Efremova, V.: Photokinesigraphic characteristics of Kallikrein-treated bull spermatozoa. In: Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156B, 1187–1193 (1983)Google Scholar
  78. Braun, V.: Bacterial cell surface receptors. In: Cells and Inflammation: Modern Trends and Technical Outlook. Symposia of the Department of Pathology, University of Ulm. Klin. Wochenschr. 62, 479–503 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Bray, M.A., Ford-Hutchinson, A.W., Smith, M.J.H.: Leukotriene B4: An inflammatory mediator in vivo. Prostaglandins 22, 213–222 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  80. Bretz, U.: Stimulation of lymphocytes by polymorphonuclear leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G, in vitro. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban und Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 323–329 (1978)Google Scholar
  81. Broxmeyer, H.E., van Zant, G., Zucali, J.R., Lovsne, J., Gordon, A.S.: Mechanisms of leukocyte production and release XII, A comparative assay of the leukocytosis-inducing factor (LIF) and the colony-stimulating factor (CSF). Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 145, 1262–1267 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  82. Broxmeyer, H.E., Smithyman, A., Eger, R.R., Meyers, P.A., de Sousa, M.: Identification of lactoferrin as the granulocyte-derived inhibitor of colony-stimulating activity production. J. Exp. Med. 148, 1052–1067 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Bruhn, H.D., Pohl, J.: Growth regulation of fibroblasts by thrombin, factor XIII and fibronectin. Klin. Wochenschr. 59, 145–146 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Brunner, H.: Adherence of bacteria to host cells. In: Cells and inflammation, Modern trends and technical outlook. Symposia of the department of pathology, University of Ulm. Klin. Wochenschr. 62, 479–503 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Bucher, N.L.R., Swaffield, M.N.: The rate of incorporation of labelled thymidine in the deoxyribonucleic acid of regenerating rat liver in relation to the amount of liver excised. Cancer Res. 24, 1611–1625 (1964)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  86. Bultmann, B.D., Gruler, H.: Analysis of the directed and nondirected movement of human granulocytes: Influence of temperature and ECHO 9 Virus on N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine-induced chemokinesis and chemotaxis. J. Cell. Biol. 96, 1708–1716 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Bultmann, B., Eggers, H.J., Haferkamp, O.: Selective inhibition of human neutrophil chemotaxis by ECHO-Virus Type O. Klin. Wochenschr. 59, 571–573 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Bultmann, B., Wildfeuer, A., Schindlbeck, U., Kleihauer, E., Heimpel, H., Wigger, H.J., Haferkamp, O.: Critical analysis of granulocyte function in 154 patients with different diseases. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 1289–1295 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Bullough, W.S.: Chalone control mechanisms. Life Sci. 16, 323–330 (1975)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Buntrock, P.: Ultrastrukturelle Charakterisierung von Fibroblasten, Myofibroblasten und Fi- broblasten im Wundheilungsprozeß. Zbl. allg. Path. u. patholog. Anat. 124, 48–59 (1980)Google Scholar
  91. Burgess, A.W., Metcalf, D.: Colony-stimulating factor and the differentiation of granulocytes and macrophages. Baum, S.J., Ledney, G.D., Experimental Hematology today. Springer Verlag, New York, Heidelberg, Berlin, 135–146 (1977)Google Scholar
  92. Busse, W.W.: Histamine: mediator and modulator in inflammation. In: Glynn, L.E., Houck, J.C., Weissmann, G., Handbook of Inflammation 1. Elsevier/North-Holland, Biomedical Press, Amsterdam-New York-Oxford, 1–45 (1979)Google Scholar
  93. Canonico, P.G., Mc Manus, A.T., Powanda, M.C.: Biochemistry and function of the neutrophil in infected, burned and traumatized hosts. Front. Biol. 48, 287–326 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. Carpenter, G., Cohen, S.: Epidermal Growth Factor. Ann. Rev. Biochem. 48, 193–216 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Carr, I.: The biology of macrophages. In: Clin. Invest. Med. 1, 59–69 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  96. Carrell, R.W., Jeppson, J.-O., Laurell, L.-B., Brennan, S.O., Owen, M.C., Vaughan, L., Boswell, D.R.: Structure and variation of human Alpha-l -Antitrypsin. Nature 298, 329–333 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Casey, L., Krieger, B., Kohler, J., Rice, C., Oparil, S., Szidon, P.: Decreased serum angiotensin converting enzyme in adult respiratory distress syndrome associated with sepsis: A preliminary report. Critical Care Medicine 9, 651–654 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Cashley-Smith, J.R.: The lymphatic system in inflammation. In: Zweifach, B.W., Grant, L., McCluskey, R.T., The Inflammatory Process 2, Academic Press, New York, 161–204 (1973)Google Scholar
  99. Cashley-Smith, J.R.: The fine structure of the microvasculature in inflammation. Biblioth. anat. 17, 36–53 (1979)Google Scholar
  100. Cashley-Smith, J.R., Carter, D.B.: The passage of macromolecules across inflamed capillary endothelium via large vacuoles. Microvasc. Res. 18, 319–324 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Castor, C.W.: Autacoid regulation of wound healing. In: Glynn, L.E., Handbook of Inflammation 3, Elsevier/North-Holland, Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, 177–209 (1981)Google Scholar
  102. Castor, C.W., Ritchie, J.C., Scott, M.E., Withney, S.L.: Connective Tissue Activation, XI. Stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and DNA formation by platelet factor. Arthr. Rheum. 20, 859–868 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Cesario, T.C.: The clinical implications of human interferon. Med. Clin. North Am. 67, 1147–1162 (1983)Google Scholar
  104. Charlesworth, J.A., Pussell, B.A.: Complement deficiency and disease. Anst. N. Z. J. Med. 12, 649–655 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Chenoweth, D.E., Hugli, T.E.: Demonstration of specific C5a receptor on intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3943–3947 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  106. Chikappa, C., Chanana, A.D., Chandra, P., Cronkite, E.P.: Kinetics and regulation of granulocyte precursors during a granulopoietic stress. Blood 50, 1099–1110 (1977)Google Scholar
  107. Christensen, U., Clemmensen, I.: Purification and reaction mechanisms of the primary inhibitor of plasmin from human plasma. Biochem. J. 175, 635–641 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  108. Clark, J.A.: Suggested importance of monokines in pathophysiology of endotoxin shock and malaria. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 756–758 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  109. Clark, R., Klebanoff, S.J.: Chemotactic factor inactivation by the Myeloperoxidase-HydrogenPeroxide-Halid System, an inflammatory control mechanism. J. Clin. Invest. 64, 913–920 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. Clark, R.A., Szot, S.: The myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-halide system as effector of neutrophil-mediated tumor cell cytotoxicity. J. Immunol. 126, 1295–1301 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  111. Clark, R.A.F., Sandler, J.A., Gatlin, J.I., Kaplan, A.P.: Histamine modulation of eosinophil migration. J. Immunol. 118, 137–145 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  112. Clemmensen, I.: Editorial: Fibronectin and its role in connective diseases. Eur. J. Clin. Invest. 11, 145–146 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Clemmensen, I., Bach Andersen, R.: The fibrinolytic system and its relation to inflammatory diseases. Sem. Arthr. Rheum. 11, 390–398 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Clemmons, D.R., van Wyk, J.J.: Somatomedin C and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate human fibroblast replication. J. Cell. Physiol. 106, 361–367 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Cline, M.J.: Monocytes macrophages, and their diseases in man. J. Invest. Dermatol. 71, 56–58 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Clore, J.N., Cohen, I.K., Diegelmann, R.F.: Quantitation of collagen types I and III during wound healing in rat skin. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 161, 337–340 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  117. Cohen, K., Mc Coy, B.J.: The biology and control of surface overheating. World J. Surg. 4, 289–295 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  118. Cohen, S., Yoshida, T.: Suppression of B-cell MIF production by T-cells and soluble T-cellderived factors. J. Immunol. 119, 719–721 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  119. Cohen, S., Yoshida, T.: Regulation of lymphokine function. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. USA 332, 356–362 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  120. Cohen, S., Fisher, B., Yoshida, T., Bettigole, R.E.: Serum migration-inhibitory activity in patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. N. Eng. J. Med. 290, 882–886 (1974)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  121. Colvin, R.B., Dvorak, H.F.: Role of granulocytes in cell-mediated immunity. In: Cohen, S., Ward, P.A., Mc Cluskey, R.T., Mechanisms in Immunopathology. Wiley & Sons, New York, 69–89 (1979)Google Scholar
  122. Connolly, J.C., Mc Lean, C., Tabaqchali, S.: The effect of capsular polysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide of bacteroides fragilis on polymorph function and serum killing. J. Med. Microbiol. 17, 259–271 (1984)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  123. Cooper, N.R., Miles, L.A., Griffin, J.H.: Effects of plasma kallikrein and plasmin on the first complement component. J. Immunol. 124, 1517 (abstract) (1980)Google Scholar
  124. Cooper, N.R.: Activation and regulation of the first complement component. Fed. Proc. 42, 134–138 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  125. Cotran, R.S.: The endothelium and inflammation: New insights. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufman, N., Current Topics in Inflammation and Infection. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore/London, 18–37 (1982)Google Scholar
  126. Cotran, R.S., Majno, G.: A light and electron microscopic analysis of vascular injury. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 116, 750–764 (1964)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  127. Cottier, H.: Pathogenese. Ein Handbuch für die ärztliche Fortbildung. Bd. 1, 4. Teil, Pathologie der Zellverbände und Zellinien sowie ihrer Erneuerung, Springer Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 137–176 (1980a)Google Scholar
  128. Cottier, H.: Pathogenese. Ein Handbuch für die ärztliche Fortbildung. Bd. 2, 10. Teil, Resistenz und Immunität: Störungen und krankmachende Folgen, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1057–1242 (1980b)Google Scholar
  129. Cottier, H.: Pathogenese. Ein Handbuch für die ärztliche Fortbildung, Bd. 2, 11. Teil, Entzündliche Reaktionen, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1243–1356 (1980b)Google Scholar
  130. Cottier, H.: Pathogenese. Ein Handbuch für die ärztliche Fortbildung, Bd. 2, 12. Teil, Wundheilung, Reparation und ihre Störungen, mit Hinweisen auf Fremdkörperreaktionen, Resistenz und Immunität: Störungen und krankmachende Reaktionen, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1357–1384 (1980b)Google Scholar
  131. Cottier, H., Hess, M.W., Keller, H.U., Schaffner, Th.: Chemokinese, Chemotaxis und Funktionen von Phagozyten, mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der Makrophagen. Verh. Dtsch. Ges. Path. 64, 24–47 (1980)Google Scholar
  132. Courtoy, P.J., Lombart, C., Feldmann, G., Mognilevsky, N., Rogier, E.: Synchronous increase of four acute phase proteins synthesized by the same hepatocytes during the inflammatory reaction. Lab. Invest. 44, 105–115 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  133. Cranston, W.I.: Prostaglandins as mediators of pyrexia. Agents Actions Suppl. 6, 79–81 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  134. Crawford, J.P., Movat, H.Z., Ranadive, H., Hay, J.B.: Pathways to inflammation induced by immune complexes: Development of the arthus reaction. Fed. Proc. 41, 2583–2587 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  135. Creter, D., Allalouf, D.: Kallikrein and prekallikrein determination in a number of pathological conditions using the centrifichem analyzer. Annals of Allergy 48, 349–350 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  136. Crofton, R.W., Diesselhoff-den Dulk, M., van Furth, R.: The origin, kinetics, and characteristics of the Kupffer cells in the normal steady state. J. Exp. Med. 148, 1–17 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  137. Cronkite, E.P.: Kinetics of granulocytopoiesis. Clinics in Haematology 8, 351–370 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  138. Cronkite, E.P., Burlington, H., Chanana, A.D., Joel, D.D., Reincke, U., Stevens, J.: Concepts and observations on the regulation of granulocyte production. In: Baum, S.J., Ledney, G.D., Experimental Hematology Today. Springer Verlag, New York, Heidelberg, Berlin, 41–49 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  139. Crutchley, D.J., Ryan, J.W., Ryan, U.S., Fisher, G.H., Paul, S.M.: Effects of bradykinin and its homologs on the metabolism of arachidonate by endothelial cells. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 527–532 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  140. Dabrowski, R., Maslinski, C.Z.: The role of histamine in wound healing II: The effect of antagonists and agonists of histamin receptors (H, and H2) on collagen levels in granulation tissue. Agents Actions II, 122–124 (1981)Google Scholar
  141. Dahlén, S.E., Hedqvist, P., Hammarström, S., Samuelsson, B.: Leukotrienes are potent constrictors of human bronchi. Nature 288, 484–486 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  142. Dahlén, S.E., Björk, J., Hedqvist, P., Arfors, K.-E., Hammarström, S., Lindgren, A., Samuelsson, B.: Leukotrienes promote plasma leakage and leukocyte adhesion in post-capillary venules: In vivo effects with relevance to the acute inflammatory response. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 3887–3891 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  143. Dancey, J.T., Deubelbeiss, K.A., Harker, L.A., Finch, C.A.: Neutrophil kinetics in man. J. Clin. Invest. 58, 705–715 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  144. Danielsen, C.C., Gottrup, F.: Healing of incisional wounds in stomach and duodenum: Collagen Synthesis. Eur. surg. Res. 13, 198–201 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  145. Dannenberg, A.M., Suga, M., Garcia-Gonzales, J.E.: Macrophages in granulomas: Histochemical evidence suggesting local control of heterogenous functions. In: Schmalz, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.-E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 109–119 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  146. Datenbuch Anästhesiologie and Intensivmedizin Bd. 2 Intensivmedizin, Niemer, M., Nemes, C. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart, New York, 520–569 (1979)Google Scholar
  147. David, J.R., Remold, H.G.: The activation of macrophages by lymphokines. In: Cohen, St., Pich, E., Oppenheim, J.J., Biology of the Lymphokines. Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, London, 121–139 (1979)Google Scholar
  148. David, J.R., Remold, H.G., Higgins, T.J., Lin, D.Y., Churchill, W.H.: MIF/MAF-macrophage interactions: Biochemical characterization of putative glycoproteid receptor for MIF and the existence and properties of two distinct MIFs. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 527–535 (1980)Google Scholar
  149. Davies, P., Bonney, R.J., Humes, J.L., Kuehl, F.A.: Macrophages responding to inflammatory stimuli synthesize increased amounts of prostaglandins. Agents Actions Suppl. 6, 143–149 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  150. Davies, P., Bonney, R.J., Humes, J.L., Kuehl, F.A.: The synthesis of arachidonic acid oxygenation products by various mononuclear phagocyte populations. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1317–1345 (1980a)Google Scholar
  151. Davies, P., Bonney, R.J., Humes, J.L., Kuehl, F.A.: The role of macrophage secretory products in chronic inflammatory processes. J. Invest. Derm. 74, 292–296 (1980b)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  152. Davies, P., Bonney, R.J., Humes, J.L., Kuehl Jr., F.A.: Secretion of arachidonic acid oxygenation products by mononuclear phagocytes: Their possible significance as modulators of lymphocyte function. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 347–360 (1980c)Google Scholar
  153. De Clerck, F.F., Herman, A.G.: 5-Hydroxytryptamine and platelet aggregation. Fed. Proc. 42, 228–232 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  154. De Clerck, F.F., David, J.L., Janssen, P.A.J.: Inhibition of 5-hydroxytryptamine — induced and — amplified human platelet aggregation by ketanserin (R41468), a selective 5-HT, receptor antagonist. Agents Actions 112, 388–397 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  155. Deuel, T.F., Senior, R.M., Chang, D., Griffin, G.L., Henrikson, R.L., Kaiser, E.T.: Platelet factor 4 is chemotactic for neutrophils and monocytes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 4584–4587 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  156. Diegelmann, R.F., Cohen, I.K., Kaplan, A.M.: The role of macrophages in wound repair: A review. Plast. reconstr. surg. 68, 107–113 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  157. Dietrich, M.P., Landen, B.: Complement bridges between cells. Analysis of possible interaction mechanism. J. Exp. Med. 146, 1484–1495 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  158. Dimitriu, A., Fauci, A.S.: Activation of human B lymphocytes. IX. Modulation of antibody production by products of activated macrophages. J. Immunol. 120, 1818–1823 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  159. Dinarello, Ch., Wolff, S.M.: Production of fever and its effects on the host. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 727–730 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  160. Di Rosa, M., Giroud, J.P., Willoughby, D.A.: Studies of the mediators of the acute inflammatory response induced in rats in different sites by carrageenan and turpentine. J. Pathol. 104, 15–29 (1971)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  161. Dobson, N.J., Lambris, J.D., Ross, G.D.: Characteristics of isolated erythrocyte complement receptor type one (Cr„ C4b-C3b-receptor) and Cr,-specific antibody. J. Immunol. 126, 693–698 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  162. Donaldson, V.H., Rosen, F.S., Bing, D.H.: Kinin generation in hereditary angioneurotic edema (H.A.N.E.) plasma. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 183–191 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  163. D’Onofrio, C., Paradisi, F.: The influence of bacterial exotoxins and endotoxins on the phagocytic activity of human macrophages in culture. Infection 11, 137–143 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  164. Droller, M.J., Schneider, M.U., Perlmann, P.: A possible role of prostaglandins in the inhibition of natural and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells. Cell. Immunol. 39, 165–177 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  165. Dunn, C.J., Willoughby, D.A.: Leukocyte and macrophage migration inhibitory activities in inflammatory exsudates — involvement of the coagulation system. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4, Academic Press, New York, 231–269 (1981)Google Scholar
  166. Dvorak, A.M., Dvorak, H.F.: The basophil, its morphology, biochemistry, motility, release reactions, recovery, and role in the inflammatory responses of IgE-mediated and cell-mediated origin. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 103, 551–557 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  167. Dvorak, A.M., Galli, S.J., Schulman, E.S., Lichtenstein, L.M., Dvorak, H.F.: Basophil and mast cell degranulation: Ultrastructural analysis of mechanisms of mediator release. Fed. Proc. 42, 2510–2515 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  168. Earp, H.S., O’Keefe, E.J.: Epidermal Growth Factor receptor number decreases during rat liver regeneration. J. Clin. Invest. 67, 1580–1583 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  169. Edelson, P.J.: Macrophage ecto-enzymes: Their identification, metabolism and control. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear phagocytes, Functional Aspects I, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 665–681 (1980)Google Scholar
  170. Edelson, P.J.: Macrophage plasma membrane enzymes as differentiation markers of macro-phage activation. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3, Academic Press, New York, 57–83 (1981)Google Scholar
  171. Edelson, P.J., Zwiebel, R., Cohn, Z.A.: The pinocytotic rate of activated macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 142, 1150–1164 (1975)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  172. Egberg, N., Gallimore, M.J.: Studies on Hageman-Faktor, plasma prekallikrein, kallikrein“like” activity, and kallikrein inhibition in plasma samples from normal subjects and clinical material. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156B, 1109–1117 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  173. Elgjo, K., Laerum, O.D., Edgehill, W.: Growth regulation in mouse epidermis. I. G2-inhibitor present in the basal cell layer. Virchows Arch. Abt. B Zellpath. 8, 277–283 (1971)Google Scholar
  174. Elgjo, K., Laerum, O.D., Edgehill, W.: Growth regulation in mouse epidermis II. G,-inhibitor present in the differentiating cell layer. Virchows Arch. B Zellpath. 10, 229–236 (1972)Google Scholar
  175. Ellner, J.J., Mahmoud, A.F.: Cytotoxicity of activated macrophages for the multicellular parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3, Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 297–333 (1981)Google Scholar
  176. Erb, P., Vogt, P.: Activation of T-cells by I-region products released by macrophages. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 2, Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 125–152 (1981)Google Scholar
  177. Erb, P., Feldmann, M., Gisler, R., Meier, B., Stern, A., Vogt, P.: Role of macrophages in the in vitro induction and regulation of antibody responses. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1857–1883 (1980)Google Scholar
  178. Erdös, E.G.: The angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme. Fed. Proc. 36, 1760–1765 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  179. Ezekowitz, R.A.B., Gordon, S.: Alterations of surface properties by macrophage activation: Expression of receptors for Fc and Mannose-terminal glycoproteins and differentiation antigens. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Plenum Press, New York and London, 33–56 (1984)Google Scholar
  180. Fantone, J.C., Ward, P.A.: Role of oxygen-derived free radicals and metabolites in leukocyte-dependent inflammatory reactions. Am. J. Path. 107, 397–418 (1982)Google Scholar
  181. Fantone, J., Senior, R.M., Kreutzer, D.L., Jones, M., Ward, P.A.: Biochemical quantitation of the chemotactic factor inactivator activity in human serum. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 93, 17–24 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  182. Farrar, J.J., Hilfiker, M.L.: Antigen-nonspecific helper factors in the antibody response. Fed. Proc. 41, 263–268 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  183. Farrar, W.L., Mizel, S.B., Farrar, J.J.: Participation of lymphocyte activating factor (Interleukin.I) in the induction of cytotoxic T cell responses. J. Immunol. 124, 1371–1377 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  184. Farrar, W.L., Johnson, H.M., Farrar, J.J.: Regulation of the production of immun interferon and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes by interleukin 2. J. Immunol. 126, 1120–1125 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  185. Farzad, A., Penneys, N.S., Ghaffar, N.S., Ziboh, V.A., Schlossberg, J.: PGE2and PGF2a: Biosynthesis in stimulated and non-stimulated peritoneal preparations containing macrophages. Prostaglandins 14, 829–837 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  186. Feldmann, M., Kontiainen, S.: The role of antigen-specific-T-cell-factors in the immune response. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 2, Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 87–123 (1981)Google Scholar
  187. Fenoglio, C.M., Lefkowitch, J.H.: Viruses and Cancer, Med. Clin. North. Am. 67, 1105–1127 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  188. Ferluga, J., Schorlemmer, H.U., Baptista, L.C., Allison, A.C.: Production of the complement cleavage product, C 3a, by activated macrophages and its tumorolytic effects. Clin. exp. Immunol. 31, 512–517 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  189. Fernandez, H.N., Hugli, T.E.: Partial characterization of human C5a anaphylatoxin, I. Chemical description of the carbohydrate and polypeptide portions of human C5a. J. Immunol. 117, 1688–1694 (1976)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  190. Fernandez, H.N., Henson, P.M., Otani, A., Hugli, T.E.: Chemotactic response to human C3a and C5a anaphylatoxin under simulated in vivo conditions. J. Immunol. 120, 109–115 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  191. Ferreira, S.H.: Local control of inflammatory pain. Agents Actions II, 636–638 (1981)Google Scholar
  192. Fidler, I.J., Raz, A.: The induction of tumoricidal capacities in mouse and rat macrophages by lymphokines. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3, Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 345–363 (1981)Google Scholar
  193. Fischer, A., Durandy, A., Griscelli, C.: Role of prostaglandin E, in the induction of non-specific T lymphocyte suppressor activity. J. Immunol. 126, 1452–1455 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  194. Fleisher, T.A., Greene, W.C., Blaese, M., Waldmann, T.A.: Soluble suppressor supernatants elaborated by Concanavalin-A activated human mononuclear cells. J. Immunol. 126, 1192–1197 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  195. Flynn, S.B., Owen, D.A.A.: Histamine H,- and ft-receptor antagonists reduce histamine-induced increases in vascular permeability and edema formation in cat skeletal muscle. Agents Actions 9, 450–451 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  196. Folkman, J., Haudenschild, C.: Angiogenesis in vitro. Nature 288, 551–556 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  197. Forrest, L.: Current concepts in soft connective tissue wound healing. Br. J. Surg. 70, 133–140 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  198. Friedman, H., Specter, S., Bendinelli, M.: Influence of viruses on cells of the immune response system. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 162, 463–474 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  199. Fritz, H.: Necessity of a critical consideration of the homogeneity of PMN proteases applied to biological assay systems: Failure to defect intrinsic kininogenase activity in PMN Elastase. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes, Urban und Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 261–263 (1978)Google Scholar
  200. Fritz, H.: Kinin 1981-Opening address, International conference on kallikrein, kinins, kininogens, kininases. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 1–9 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  201. Fritz, H., Fink, E., Truscheit, E.: Kallikrein inhibitors. Fed. Proc. 38, 2753–2759 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  202. Gabbiani, G., Lelons, M., Bailey, A.J., Bazin, S., Delaunay, A.: Collagen and myofibroblasts of granulation tissue. A chemical, ultrastructural and immunological study. Virchows Arch. B. Cell. Path. 21, 133–145 (1976)Google Scholar
  203. Gallin, E.K., Gallin, J.L: Interaction of chemotactic factors with human macrophages, induction of transmembrane potential changes. J. Cell. Biol. 75, 277–289 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  204. Gallin, E.K., Seligmann, B.E., Gallin, J.I.: Alteration of macrophage and monocyte membrane potential by chemotactic factors. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 505–523 (1980)Google Scholar
  205. Gallin, J.I., Kaplan, A.P.: Mononuclear cell chemotactic activity of Kallikrein and plasminogen activator and its inhibition by C 1 Inhibitor and alpha-2-Macroglobulin. J. Immunol. 113, 1928–1934 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  206. Gallin, J.I., Seligmann, B.E.: Neutrophil Chemoattractant fMet-Leu-Phe receptor expression and ionic events following activation. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 83–108 (1984)Google Scholar
  207. Gallin, J.I., Wright, D.G.: Role of secretory events in modulating human neutrophil chemotaxis. J. Clin. Invest. 62, 1364–1374 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  208. Gallin, J.I., Gallin, E.K., Malech, H.L., Cramer, E.B.: Structural and ionic events during leukocyte chemotaxis. In: Gallin, J.I., Quie, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis. Raven Press, New York, 123–141 (1978)Google Scholar
  209. Gallin, J.I., Gallin, E.K., Schiffmann, E.: Mechanism of leukocyte chemotaxis. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 123–138 (1979)Google Scholar
  210. Gallin, J.L, Fletcher, M.P., Seligmann, B.E., Hoffstein, S., Cehrs, K., Monnessa, N.: Human neutrophil specific granule deficiency: A model to assess the role of neutrophil specific granules in the evolution of the inflammatory response. Blood 59, 1317–1329 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  211. Gauss-Müller, V., Kleinman, H.K., Martin, G.R., Schiffmann, E.: Role of attachment factors and attractants in fibroblast chemotaxis. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 96, 1071–1080 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  212. Geczy, C.L., Hopper, K.E.: A mechanism of migration inhibition in delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. II. Lymphokines promote procoagulant activity of macrophages in vitro. J. Immunol. 126, 1059–1065 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  213. Geiger, R., König, G., Fruhmann, G.: Inhibition of human tissue (urinary) kallikrein by sera of patients suffering from hereditary alpha-l-Antitrypsin (alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor) deficiency. Hoppe-Seyler’s Z. Physiol. Chem. 362, 1013–1015 (1981)Google Scholar
  214. Geiger, R., Hofmann, W., Franke, M., Baur, X.: Biochemistry of human tissue Kallikrein. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156a, 275–288 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  215. Gemmel, C.G.: Comparative study of the nature and biological activities of bacterial enterotoxins. J. Med. Microbiol. 17, 217–235 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  216. Gemsa, D.: Stimulation of prostaglandin E release from macrophages and possible role in the immune response. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 335–374 (1981)Google Scholar
  217. Gemsa, D., Seitz, M., Menzel, J., Grimm, W., Kramer, W., Till, G.: Modulation of phagocytoses induced prostaglandin release from macrophage. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 114, 421–426 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  218. Gery, I., Davies, P.: Immunoregulatory products of macrophages. In: Cohen, S., Pick, E., Oppenheim, J.J., Biology of the Lymphokines. Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, London, 347–367 (1979)Google Scholar
  219. Gespach, C., Abita, J.-P.: Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Pharmacological characterization of histamine receptors mediating the elevation of cyclic AMP. Mol. Pharmacol. 21, 78–85 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  220. Ghebrehiwet, B., Silverberg, M., Kaplan, A.: Activation of the classical pathway of complement by Hageman factor fragment. J. Exp. Med. 153, 665–676 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  221. Gierhake, F.W.: Die infizierte Wunde. Langenbecks Arch. Chir. 358, 167–171 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  222. Gillis, S.: Interleukin biochemistry and biology: Summary and introduction. Fed. Proc. 42, 2635–2638 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  223. Ginsberg, M.H.: Role of platelets in inflammation and rheumatic disease. In: Weissmann, G., Advances in Inflammation Research. Raven Press, New York, 53–71 (1981)Google Scholar
  224. Ginsberg, M.H., Jaques, B., Cochrane, C.G., Griffin, J.H.: Urate crystal-dependent cleavage of Hageman factor in human plasma and synovial fluid. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 95, 497–506 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  225. Glovsky, M.M., Hugli, T.E., Ishizaka, T., Lichtenstein, L.M., Erickson, B.W.: Anaphylatoxin- induced histamine release with human leukocytes. J. Clin. Invest. 64, 804–811 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  226. Götze, O., Bianco, C., Sundsmo, J.S., Cohn, Z.A.: The stimulation of mononuclear phagocytes by components of the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1421–1422 (1980)Google Scholar
  227. Goetzl, E.J.: Regulation of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic response by immunological reactions. In: Gallin, J.L, Quie, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis. Raven Press, New York, 161–177 (1978)Google Scholar
  228. Goetzl, E.J.: Mediators of immediate hypersensitivity derived from arachidonic acid. N. Eng. J. Med. 303, 822–825 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  229. Goetzl, E.J.: Oxygenation products of arachidonic acid as mediators of hypersensitivity and inflammation. Med. Clin. North Am. 65, 809–828 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  230. Goetzl, E.J., Gorman, R.K.: Chemotactic and chemokinetic stimulation of human eosinophil and neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes by 12-L-Hydroxy-5,8,10-Heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). J. Immunol. 120, 526–531 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  231. Goetzl, E.J., Gigli, I., Wassermann, St., Austen, F.: A neutrophil immobilizing factor derived from human leukocytes, II. Specifity of action on polymorphonuclear leukocyte mobility. J. Immunol. 111, 938–945 (1973)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  232. Goetzl, E.J., Woods, J.M., Gorman, K.M.: Stimulation of human eosinophil and neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis and random migration by 12-L-Hydroxy5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid. J. Clin. Invest. 59, 179–183 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  233. Goetzl, E.J., Weller, P.F., Valone, F.H.: Biochemical and functional bases of the human eosinophil. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 157–167 (1979)Google Scholar
  234. Goetzl, E.J., Weller, D.F., Sun, F.F.: The regulation of human eosinophil function by endogenous mono-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). J. Immunol. 124, 926–933 (1980a)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  235. Goetzl, E.J., Derlan, C., Valone, F.H.: The extracellular and intracellular roles of hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acids in the modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage function. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 28, 105–111 (1980)Google Scholar
  236. Golde, D.W.: Growth factors. Ann. Int. Med. 92, 650–662 (1980)Google Scholar
  237. Golds, E.E., Ciosek, C.P., Hamilton, J.Ä.: Differential release of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase from mononuclear cell-stimulated synovial cells. Arthr. Rheum. 26, 15–21 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  238. Goldstein, I.M.: Neutrophil degranulation. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 189–219 (1984)Google Scholar
  239. Goldstein, I. M.: Endogenous regulation of complement (C 5)-derived chemotactic activity. Fine-tuning of inflammation. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 93, 13–16 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  240. Goldstein, I., Hoffstein, S., Gallin, I., Weissmann, G.: Mechanisms of lysosomal enzyme release from human leukocytes: Microtubule assembly and membrane fusion induced by a component of complement. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 2916–2920 (1973)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  241. Goldstein, I.M., Kaplan, H.B., Radin, A., Frasch, M.: Independent effects of IgG and complement upon human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function. I. Immunol. 117, 1282–1287 (1976)Google Scholar
  242. Goldstein, I.M., Malmsten, C.L., Kindahl, H., Kaplan, H.B., Râdmark, O., Samuelsson, B., Weissmann, G.: Thromboxane generation by human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J. Exp. Med. 148, 787–792 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  243. Goldstein, I.M., Kaplan, H.B., Edelson, H.S., Weissmann, G.: Ceruloplasmin — A scavenger of superoxide anion radicals. J. Biol. Chem. 254, 4040–4045 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  244. Goldstein, I.M., Kaplan, H.B., Edelson, H.S., Weissmann, G.: Ceruloplasmin: An acute phase reactant that scavenges oxygen-derived free radicals. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. USA 389, 368–378 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  245. Goodman, M.G., Chenoweth, D.E., Weigle, W.O.: Induction of interleukin 1 secretion and enhancement of humoral immunity by binding of human C 5a to macrophage surface C 5a receptors. J. Exp. Med. 1156, 912–917 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  246. Goodwin, J.S.: Prostaglandins and host defense in cancer. Med. Clin. North. Am. 65, 829–844 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  247. Goodwin, J.S., Bankhurst, A.D., Messner, R.P.: Suppression of human T-cell mitogenesis by prostaglandin existence of a prostaglandin-producing suppressor cell. J. Exp. Med. 146, 1719–1734 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  248. Gordon, D., Bray, M.A., Morley, J.: Control of lymphokine secretion by prostaglandins. Nature 262, 401–402 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  249. Gordon, L.I., Douglas, S.D., Kay, N.E., Yamada, O., Osserman, E.F., Jacob, H.S.: Modulation of neutrophil function by lysozyme, potential negative feedback system of inflammation. J. Clin. Invest. 64, 226–232 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  250. Gordon, S.: Lysozyme and plasminogen activator: Constitutive and induced secretory products of mononuclear phagocytes. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1273–1294 (1980)Google Scholar
  251. Gorevic, P.D., Cleveland, A.B., Franklin, E.C.: The biologic significance of amyloid. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. USA 389, 380–393 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  252. Gospodarowicz, D.: Growth factors for animal cells in culture: A nonimmunologist’s view of mitogenic factors other than lymphokines. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 1–33 (1981)Google Scholar
  253. Gottrup, F.: Healing of incisional wound in stomach and duodenum. Collagen distribution and relation to mechanical strength. Am. J. Surg. 141, 222–227 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  254. Grant, J.A., Dupree, E., Goldmann, A.S., Schultz, D.R., Jackson, A.L.: Complement-mediated release of histamine from human leukocytes. J. Immunol. 114, 1101–1106 (1975)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  255. Greenberg, P., Mara, B.: Intramedullary influences on in vitro granulopoiesis in human acute myeloid leukemia. In: Weth, R., Gallo, R.C., Hofschneider, P.H., Mannweiler, K., Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Modern Trends in Human Leukemia III, Newest Results in Clinical and Biological Research. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 199–204 (1979)Google Scholar
  256. Greene, W.C., Fleisher, T.A., Waldmann, T.A.: Soluble suppressor supernatants elaborated by Concavalin A-activated human mononuclear cells. J. Immunol. 126, 1185–1191 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  257. Grey, H.M., Anderson, C.L.: Structural characteristics of Fe-receptors on macrophages. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 757–778 (1980)Google Scholar
  258. Griffin, F.M.: Activation of macrophage complement receptors for phagocytosis. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13., Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 57–70 (1984)Google Scholar
  259. Griffin, F.M., Griffin, J.A., Silverstein, S.C.: Studies on the mechanism of phagocytosis II. The Interaction of macrophages with anti-immunglobulin IgG-coated bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. J. Exp. Med. 146, 788–809 (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  260. Griffin, J.H.: Role of surface in surface-dependent activation of Hageman factor (blood coagulation factor XII). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 1998–2002 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  261. Gupta, R.G., Sicilian, L., Catchatourian, R., Bekerman, C., Oparil, S., Szidon, J.P.: Angiotensin-converting enzyme in serum and in bronchoalveolar lavage in sarcoidosis. Respiration 43, 153–157 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  262. Gupta, S., Ross, G.D., Good, R.A., Siegal, F.P.: Surface markers of human eosinophils. Blood 48, 755–763 (1975)Google Scholar
  263. Habal, F.M., Burrowes, C.E., Movat, H.Z.: Generation of kinin by plasma kallikrein and plasmin and the effect of alpha-1-antitrypsin and antithrombin III on the kininogenases. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 70, 23–35 (1976)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  264. Haberland, G., Mc Conn, R.: A rationale for the therapeutic action of aprotinin. Fed. Proc. 38, 2760–2767 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  265. Hadding, U.: Komplement, Gerinnungsfaktoren und Kinine — in ihrer funktionellen Verknüpfung. In: Werner, M., Rother K., Meier-Sydow, J., Immunologische Aspekte der Entzündungsreaktion. Supplement Bd. 2 zu Zeitschrift für Immunitätsforschung — Immunobiology. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart-New York, 14–26 (1977)Google Scholar
  266. Hadding, U.: Das Komplementsystem. Medizin in unserer Zeit 4, 23–32 (1980)Google Scholar
  267. Haeney, M.R., Ball, A.P., Thompson, R.A.: Recurrent bacterial meningitis due to genetic deficiencies of terminal complement components (C5and C6). Immunbiol. 158, 101–106 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  268. Haferkamp, O.: Unspezifische Entzündungen: Die akute Entzündung und ihre Mediatoren. Deutsches Ärzteblatt 15, 957–960 (1980a)Google Scholar
  269. Haferkamp, O.: Unspezifische Entzündungen: Die akute Entzündung und ihre Zellen. Deutsches Ärzteblatt 14, 895–897 (1980b)Google Scholar
  270. Hamburg, S.I., Cassell, G.H., Rabinovitch, M.: Relationship between enhanced macrophage phagocytic activity and the induction of interferon by Newcastle disease virus in mice. J. Immunol. 124, 1360–1364 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  271. Hartman, D.W., Eutringer, M.A., Robinson, W.A., Vasil, M.L., Drebing, C.J., Morton, N.J., True, L.: Regulation of granulopoiesis and distribution of granulocytes in early phase of bacterial infection. J. Cell. Physiol. 109, 17–24 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  272. Hartwig, J.H., Stossel, T.P.: Cytochalasin B dissolves actin gels by breaking actin filaments. J. Cell. Biol. 79, 1741abstr. (1978)Google Scholar
  273. Hartwig, J.H., Davies, W.A., Stossel, T.P.: Evidence for contractile protein translocation in macrophage spreading, phagocytosis, and phagolysosome formation. J. Cell. Biol. 75, 956–967 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  274. Hatch, E., Nichols, W.K., Hill, H.R.: Cyclic nucleotide changes in human neutrophils induced by chemoattractants and chemotactic modulators. J. Immunol. 119, 450–456 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  275. Havemann, K., Schmidt, W., Bogdahn, U., Gramse, M.: Effect of polymorphonuclear granulocyte proteases on immunocompetent cells. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban und Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 306–322 (1978)Google Scholar
  276. Hayward, W.S., Neel, B.G., Astrin, S.M.: Activation of a cellular oncogene by promoter insertion in ALV-induced lymphoid leukosis. Nature 290, 475–480 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  277. Hébert, J., Beandoin, R., Aubin, M., Fontaine, M.: The regulatory effect of histamine on the immune response: Characterization of the cells involved. Cell. Immunol. 54, 49–57 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  278. Hébert, J., Beandoin, R., Fontaine, M., Fradet, G.: The regulatory effect of histamine on the immune response: II. Effect on the in vitro IgG-synthesis. Cell. Immunol. 58, 366–371 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  279. Hedqvist, P., Dahlén, S.-E., Palmertz, U.: Leukotriene-dependent airway anaphylaxis in guinea pigs. Prostaglandins 28, 605–608 (1984)Google Scholar
  280. Hehlmann, R., Schetters, H., Kreeb, G., Erfle, V., Schmidt, J., Luz, A.: RNA-tumorviruses, oncogenes, and their possible role in human carcinogenesis. Klin. Wochenschr. 61, 1217–1231 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  281. Heimark, R.L., Kurachi, K., Fujikawa, K., Davie, E.W.: Surface activation of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and kinin formation. Nature 286, 456–460 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  282. Heit, W., Rich, I.N., Kubanek, B.: Macrophage-dependent production of erythropoietic and colony-stimulating factor. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 71–77 (1981)Google Scholar
  283. Heldin, C.-H., Westermark, B., Wasteson, A.: Specific receptors for platelet-derived growth factor on cells derived from connective tissue and glia. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 3664–3668 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  284. Helpap, B.: Der kryochirurgische Eingriff und seine Folgen. Morphologische und zellkinetische Analyse. In: Doerr, W., Leonhardt, H., Normale und Pathologische Anatomie Bd. 40. Georg Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart, New York, (1980)Google Scholar
  285. Helpap, B.: Die Wundheilung von Leber und Nieren nach mehrfachen focalen Hitzecoagulationen. Langenbecks Arch. Chir. 354, 255–263 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  286. Helpap, B.: Die lokale Gewebsverbrennung — Folgen der Thermochirurgie. In: Rehn, J., Schweiberer, L., Hefte zur Unfallheilkunde, Band 159. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, (1983)Google Scholar
  287. Helpap, B.: Der Megakaryozyt. Morphologie, Funktion, Zellkinetik und Regulation. Band 49. In Normale und Pathologische Anatomie. Eds. W. Doerr, H. Leonhardt. Thieme Stuttgart-New York (1984)Google Scholar
  288. Helpap, B., Cremer, H.: Proliferationsvorgänge an der traumatisch geschädigten Leber. Virchows Arch. B Zellpath 6, 365–366 (1970)Google Scholar
  289. Helpap, B., Cremer, H.: Zellkinetische Untersuchungen zur Wundheilung der Mäuseleber. Virchows Arch. Abt. B Cell. Path. 10, 134–144 (1972)Google Scholar
  290. Helpap, B., Grouls, V.: The cellular reaction of the kidney after different physical injuries. Urol. Res. 9, 115–121 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  291. Helpap B., Hattori, T., Gedigk P: Repair of gastric ulcer. A cell kinetic study. Virchows Arch (Pathol Anat) 392, 159–170 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  292. Helpap, B., Grouls, V., Hesse, U.: Reaction of bone marrow after cryo-and thermolesions on internal organs. Cryobiology 22, 168–174 (1985)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  293. Helpap, B., Vogel J.: TUR prostatitis. Histological an immunhistochemical observations on a special type of granulomatous prostatitis. Path. Res. Pract. 181, 301–307 (1986)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  294. Henderson, W.R., Jörg, A., Klebanoff, S.J.: Eosinophil peroxidase-mediated inactivation of leukotrienes B„ C, and D,. J. Immunol. 128, 2609–2614 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  295. Henson, P.M.: Platelet-activating factor (PAF) as a mediator of neutrophil interactions in inflammation. Agents Actions 11, 545–547 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  296. Henson, P.M., Larsen, G.L., Webster, R.O., Mitchell, B.C., Goins, A.J., Henson, J.E.: Pulmonary microvascular alterations and injury induced by complement fragments: Synergistic effect of complement activation, neutrophil sequestration, and prostaglandins. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 384, 287–300 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  297. Hill, H.J.: Cyclic nucleotides as modulators of leucocyte chemotaxis. In: Gatlin, J.I., Quie, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis. Raven Press, New York, 179–193 (1978)Google Scholar
  298. Hill, H.R.: Clinical disorders of leukocyte function. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 345–393 (1984)Google Scholar
  299. Hoefsmit, E.C.M., Kamperdijk, W.A., Hendriks, H.R., Beelen, R.H.J., Balfour, B.M.: Lymph node macrophages. In: Carr, I., Daems, W.T., The Reticuloendothelial System, A Comprehensive Treatis, 1 Morphology. Plenum Press, New York, London, 417–468 (1980)Google Scholar
  300. Hoffstein, S.T.: Ultrastructural demonstration of calcium loss from local regions of the plasma membrane of surface-stimulated human granulocytes. J. Immunol. 123, 1395–1402 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  301. Holsapple, M.P., Schur, M., Yim, K.W.: Pharmacological modulation of edema mediated by prostaglandin, serotonin and histamine. Agents Actions 10, 368–373 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  302. Hoover, R.L., Folger, R., Haering, W.A., Ware, B.R., Karnovsky, M.J.: Adhesion of leukocytes to endothelium: Roles of divalent cations, surface change, chemotactic agents and substrate. J. Cell. Sci. 45, 73–86 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  303. Hopper, K.E., Geczy, C.L.: Characterization of guinea pig macrophages I. Mobility and maturation of peritoneal cells following inflammatory stimuli. Cell. Immunol. 56, 400–414 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  304. Houck, J.C., Patt, L.M., Lymphocyte chalone: Fact or artifact. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 35–68 (1981)Google Scholar
  305. Houck, J.C., Kanagalingam, K., Hunt, C., Attallah, A.: Lymphocyte and fibroblast chalones: Some chemical properties. Science 196, 896–897 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  306. Houck, J.C., Hellman, K.B., Chang, C.M.: The biochemistry of lymphocyte-derived mediators of immunological inflammation. Agents Actions 8, 73–79 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  307. Houslay, M.: Dual control of adenylate cyclase. Nature 303, 133 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  308. Hovi, T., Mosher, D., Vaheri, A.: Cultured human monocytes synthesize and secrete alpha2-macroglobulin. J. Exp. Med. 145, 1580–1589 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  309. Hsieh, K.-H., Lin, C.-Y., Lee, T.-C.: Complete absence of the third component of complement in a patient with repeated infections. Clin. Immunol. Immunpathol. 20, 305–312 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  310. Huber, C., Stingl, G.: Macrophages in the regulation of immunity. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 31–37 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  311. Huber, H., Ledochowski, M., Michlmayr, G.: The role of macrophages as effector cells. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 39–48 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  312. Huey, J., Narayanan, A.S., Jones, K., Page, R.C.: Effect of epidermal growth factor of the synthetic activity of human fibroblasts. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 632, 227–233 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  313. Hugli, T.E., Morgan, E.L.: Mechanisms of leukocyte regulation by complement-derived factors. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary topics in immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 109–154 (1984)Google Scholar
  314. Hugli, T.E., Müller-Eberhard, H.J.: Anaphylatoxins: C 3a and C 5a. Adv. Immunol. 26, 1–53 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  315. Hunt, T.K.: Disorders of wound healing. World J. Surg. 4, 271–277 (1980)Google Scholar
  316. Hyatt, A.C., Altenburger, K.M., Johnston, R.B., Winkelstein, M.D.: Increased susceptibility to severe pyogenic infections in patients with an inherited deficiency of the second component of complement. J. Pediatr. 98, 417–419 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  317. Issekutz, A.C., Movat, H.Z.: The in vivo quantitation and kinetics of rabbit neutrophil leukocyte accumulation in the skin in response to chemotactic agents and Escherichia coli. Lab. Invest. 42, 310–317 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  318. Issekutz, A.C., Movat, H.Z.: The effect of vasodilator prostaglandins on polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration and vascular injury. Am. J. Pathol. 107, 300–309 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  319. Issekutz, T.B., Issekutz, A.C., Movat, H.Z.: The in vivo quantitation and kinetics of monocyte migration into acute inflammatory tissue. Am. J. Pathol. 103, 47–55 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  320. Iversen, O.H.: The Chalones. In: Baserga, R., Tissue Growth Factors. Handbuch Exper. Pharmacol. 57, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 491–549 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  321. Jacob, H.S., Moldow, Ch.F., Flynn, P.J., Weisdorf, D.J., Vercellotti, G.M., Hammerschmidt, D.E.: Therapeutic ramifications of the interaction of complement, granulocytes, and platelets in the production of acute lung injury. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 384, 489–495 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  322. Janoff, A., Carp, H.: Proteases, antiproteases, and oxidants: Pathways of tissue injury during inflammation. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufmann, N., Current Topics in Inflammation and Infection. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, London, 62–82 (1982)Google Scholar
  323. Jeppson, J.-O., Laurell, C.B., Nosslin, B., Cox, D.W.: Catabolic rate of alpha-l-antitrypsin of Pi types S and MMaiton and of asialylated M-protein in man. Clin. Sci. molec. Med. 55, 103–107 (1978)Google Scholar
  324. Jochum, M., Witte, J., Schiessler, H., Selbmann, H.K., Ruckdeschl, G., Fritz, H.: Clotting and other plasma factors in experimental endotoxemia. Inhibition of degradation by exogenous proteinase inhibitors. Eur. Surg. Res. 13, 152–168 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  325. Johnson, K.J., Anderson, T.P., Ward, P.A.: Suppression of immune complex-induced inflammation by the chemotactic factor inactivator. J. Clin. Invest. 59, 951–958 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  326. Johnson, U., Ohlsson, K., Olsson, I.: Effects of granulocyte neutral proteases on complement components. Scand. J. Immunol. 5, 421–426 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  327. Johnson, W.J., Somers, S.D., Adams, D.O.: Expression and development of macrophage activation for tumor cytotoxicity. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 127–146 (1984)Google Scholar
  328. Johnston, C.I., Clappison, B.I., Anderson, W.P., Yasujima, M.: Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on circulating and local kinin levels. Am. J. Cardiol. 49, 1401–1404 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  329. Johnston, M.G., Hay, J.B., Movat, H.Z.: The modulation of enhanced vascular permeability by prostaglandins through alteration in blood flow (hyperemia). Agents Actions 6, 705–711 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  330. Johnston, M.G., Hay, J.B., Movat, H.Z.: The role of prostaglandins in inflammation. In: Movat, H.Z., Current Topics in Pathology 68, The Inflammatory Reaction. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 259–287 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  331. Johnston, R.B.: Enhancement of phagocytosis-associated oxidative metabolism as a manifestation of macrophage activation. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 33–56 (1981)Google Scholar
  332. Jouvin-Marche, E., Poitevin, B., Benveniste, J.: Platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether), an activator of neutrophil functions. Agents Actions 12, 716–720 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  333. Juan, H.: Dependence of histamine-evoked nociception on prostaglandin release. Agents Actions 11, 706–710 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  334. Juan, H., Lembeck, F.: Release of prostaglandine from isolated perfused rabbit ear by bradykinin and acetylcholine. Agents Actions 6, 642–645 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  335. Juan, H., Sametz, W.: Release and metabolism of (114C)-arachidonic acid stimulated by bradykinin. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 519–526 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  336. Kadish, A.S., Tansey, F.A., Yu, G.S.M., Doyle, A.T., Bloom, B.R.: Interferon as a mediator of human lymphocyt suppression. J. Exp. Med. 151, 637–650 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  337. Kampschmidt, R.F., Upchurch, H.F., Pulliam, L.A.: Characterization of a leukocyte-derived endogenous mediator responsible for increased plasma fibrinogen. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 389, 338–351 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  338. Kang, A.H.: Editorial: Fibroblast activation. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 92, 1–4 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  339. Kaplan, A.P., Silverberg, M., Dunn, J.T., Miller, G.: Mechanisms for Hageman factor activation and the role of HMW-Kininogen as a coagulation cofactor. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 370, 253–260 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  340. Kaplan, A.P., Dunn, J.T., Silverberg, M.: Initiation of contact activation of human plasma. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 45–61 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  341. Kapp, J.A., Areano, B.A.: Interactions of macrophages and T-Cells in the development of antibody and proliferative responses. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 141–151 (1980)Google Scholar
  342. Karen, J.: Complement: Activation, consequences, and control. Am. J. Med. Technol. 48, 735–742 (1982)Google Scholar
  343. Kather, H., Aktories, K.: cAMP-System und bakterielle Toxine. Klin. Wochenschr. 61, 1109–1114 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  344. Kay, N.E., Bumol, T.F., Douglas, S.D.: Effect of phagocytosis and Fc receptor occupancy on complement-dependent neutrophil chemotaxis. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 91, 850–856 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  345. Keller, H.U., Wissler, J.H., Hess, M.W., Cottier, H.: Distinct chemokinetic and chemotactic responses in neutrophil granulocytes. Eur. J. Immunol. 8, 1–7 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  346. Keller. R.: Regulatory functions of macrophages. Agents Actions Suppl. 7, 90–99 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  347. Keller, R.: Immunologie, Immunpathologie. Georg Thieme Verlag, Stuttgart, New York, 3–283 (1981)Google Scholar
  348. Kennedy, I., Coleman, R.A., Humphrey, P.P.A., Levy, G.P., Lumley, P.: Studies on the characterisation of prostanoid receptors: A proposed classification. Prostaglandins 24, 667–689 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  349. Kimura, Y., Saiga, T., Furnya, M., Fujrwara, H., Norose, Y., Okabe, T., Hida, M.: Suppressive effect of bradykinin to cellular immune responses in vivo and in vitro. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156B, 755–766 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  350. Kirkpatrick, C.J., Mohr, W., Haferkamp, O.: Prostaglandins and their precursors in rheumatoid arthritis: Progress and problems. Zeitschrift für Rheumatologie 41, 89–99 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  351. Kluft, C., Vellenga, E., Brommer, J.P., Wijngaards: A familial hemorrhagic diathesis in a dutch family: An inherited deficiency of alpha-2-antiplasmin. Blood 59, 1169–1180 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  352. Knighton, D.R., Hunt, T.K., Thakral, K.K., Goodson, W.H.: Role of platelets and fibrin in the healing sequence. Ann. Surg. 196, 379–388 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  353. Kopaniak, M.M., Issekutz, A.C., Movat, H.Z.: Kinetics of acute inflammation induced by E. coli in rabbits. Quantitation of blood flow, enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage, and leukocyte accumulation. Am. J. Pathol. 98, 485–493 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  354. Korchak, H.M., Serhan, C.N., Weissmann, G.: Activation of the human neutrophil: The roles of lipid remodeling and intracellular calzium. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufman, N., Current Topics in Inflammation and Infection. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, London, 83–93 (1982)Google Scholar
  355. Kozlowski, T., Raymond, R.M., Korthuis, R.J., Wang, C.Y., Grega, G.J., Robinson, N.E., Scott, J.B.: Microvascular protein efflux: Interaction of histamine and H1-receptors. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 166, 263–270 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  356. Krahenbuhl, J.L., Remington, J.S., Mc Leod, R.: Cytotoxic and microbicidal properties of macrophages. In: Van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects II., Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1631–1650 (1980)Google Scholar
  357. Kramer, H.J., Klingmüller, D., Glänzer, K., Düsing, R.: Interaction of the kinin and prostaglandin systems in mediating renal function and intrarenal hemodynamics. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 961–968 (1983)Google Scholar
  358. Kreisle, R.A., Parker, C.W.: Uptake of leukotriene B, by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Fed. Proc. 42, 2860–2861 (1983)Google Scholar
  359. Kuehl, F.A., Egan, R.W.: Prostaglandins, arachidonic acid, and inflammation. Science 210, 978–984 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  360. Kunkel, S.L., Ogawa, H., Curan, P.B., Ward, P.A., Zurier, R.B.: Suppression of acute and chronic inflammation by orally administered prostaglandins. Arthr. Rheum. 24, 1151–1158 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  361. Kurachi, K., Ohkubo, I., Heimark, R.L., Fujikawa, K., Davie, E.W.: Initiation of intrinsic blood coagulation. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156a, 39–44 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  362. Kurland, J.I.: The mononuclear phagocyte and its regulatory interactions in hemopoiesis. In: Baum, S.J., Ledney, G.D., Experimental hematology today. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 47–60 (1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  363. Kurland, J.I., Broxmeyer, H.E., Pelus, L.M., Bockman, R.S., Moore, M.A.S.: Role for monocyte-macrophage-derived colony-stimulating-factor and prostaglandin E in the positive and negative feedback control of myeloid stem cell proliferation. Blood 52, 388–407 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  364. Kurland, J.I., Pelus, L.M., Ralph, P., Bockman, R.S., Moore, M.A.S.: Induction of prostaglandin E synthesis in normal and neoplastic macrophages: Role for colony-stimulating factor(s) distinct from effects on myeloid progenitor cell proliferation. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 2326–2330 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  365. Kushner, I.: The phenomenon of the acute phase response. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 397, 39–48 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  366. Kushner, I., Ribich, W.N., Blair, J.B.: Control of the acute phase response, C-reactive protein synthesis by isolated perfused rabbit livers. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 96, 1037–1045 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  367. Lachman, L.B.: Human interleukin 1: Purification and properties. Fed. Proc. 42, 2639–2645 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  368. Land, H., Parada, L.F., Weinberg, R.A.: Cellular oncogenes and multistep carcinogenesis. Science 222, 771–778 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  369. Lang, I., Török, K., Gergely, P., Nékäm, K., Petranyi, G.Y.: Effect of histamine receptor blocking on human antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Scand. J. Immunol. 13, 361–366 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  370. Laurence, E.B.: The place of chalones among the regulators of cell production in inflammation. In: Glynn, L.E., Houck, J.C., Weissmann, G., Handbook of Inflammation I, Chemical messengers of the Inflammatory Process. Elsevier/North Holland, Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, 353–413 (1979)Google Scholar
  371. Lawrence, E.B., Spargo, D.J., Thornley, A.L.: Cell proliferation kinetics of epidermis and sebaceous glands in relation to chalone action. Cell. Tiss. Kinet. 12, 615–633 (1979)Google Scholar
  372. Lee, K.C.: Macrophage heterogeneity in the stimulation of T-cell proliferation. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 319–332 (1980)Google Scholar
  373. Leijh, P.C.J., van den Barselaar, M., van Zwet, T.L., Daha, M.R., van Furth, R.: Extracellular stimulation of intracellular killing. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects II, Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 1467–1489 (1980)Google Scholar
  374. Leppla, S.H., Anthrax toxin edema factor: A bacterial adenylate cyclase that increases cyclic AMP concentrations in eukaryotic cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 3162–3166 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  375. Levi, R., Chenonda, A.A., Trzeciakowski, J.P., Guo, Z.-G., Aaronson, L.M., Luskind, R.D., Lee, C.-H., Gay, W.A., Subramanian, V.A., Mc Cabe, J.C., Alexander, J.C.: Effects of histamine on the cardiovascular and respiratory system, Dysrhythmias caused by histamine release in guinea pig and human hearts. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 965–971 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  376. Levy, M., Habib, R.: Complement activation in nonsystemic glomerular diseases in children. Paediatrician 10, 314–342 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  377. Leyva-Cobian, F., Mampaso, M.F., Sanchez-Bayle, M., Ecija, J.L., Bootello, A.: Familial C lqdeficiency associated with renal and cutaneous disease. Clin. Exp. Immunol. 44, 173–180 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  378. Lewis, G.P.: Plasma kinins and other vasoactive compounds in acute inflammation. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 116, 847–854 (1964)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  379. Lewis, R.A., Austen, K.F.: The biologically active leukotrienes. Biosynthesis, metabolism, receptors, functions and pharmacology. J. Clin. Invest. 73, 889–897 (1984)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  380. Lewis, W.P.: Lipoxygenase-derived metabolites of arachidonate: Release and mode of action. Agents Actions 11, 569–571 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  381. Li, A.K.C., Koroly, M.J.: Mechanical and humoral factors in wound healing. Br. J. Surg. 68, 738–743 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  382. Li, A.K.C., Koroly, M.J., Schattenkerk, M.E., Malt, R.A., Young, M.: Nerve growth factor: Acceleration of the rate of wound healing in mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 4379–4381 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  383. Lichtman, M.A.: Hemopoietic stem cell disorders. Am. J. Med. Techn. 49, 97–102 (1983)Google Scholar
  384. Lieberman, J., Nosal, A., Schlessner, L.A., Sastre-Foken, A.: Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme for diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation of sarcoidosis. Am. Rev. Respir. Dis. 120, 329–335 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  385. Lima, M., Rocklin, R.E.: Histamine modulates in vitro IgG production by pokeweed mitogenstimulated human mononuclear cells. Cell. Immunol. 64, 324–336 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  386. Lindner, J.: Morphologie und Biochemie der Wundheilung. Langenbecks Arch. Chir. 358, 153–160 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  387. Lindner, J., Huber, P.: Biochemische und morphologische Grundlagen der Wundheilung und ihrer Beeinflussung. Med. Welt 24, 897–911 (1973)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  388. Lint, T.F.: Laboratory detection of complement activation and complement deficiencies. Am. J. Med. Techn. 48, 743–748 (1982)Google Scholar
  389. Lipper, S., Kahn, L.B., Reddick, R.L.: The myofibroblast. Pathol. Ann. 15, 409–441 (1980)Google Scholar
  390. Lippert, T.H.: Klinische Bedeutung der Prostaglandine. Munch. med. Wschr. 27, 645–647 (1983)Google Scholar
  391. Lipscomb, M.F., Lyons, C.R., Ben-Sasson, S.Z., Tucker, T.F., Uhr, J.W.: Mechanisms underlying the interactions of guinea pig T-lymphocytes with antigen-pulsed macrophages. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 231–244 (1980)Google Scholar
  392. Littmann, B.H., Ruddy, S.: Production of the second component of complement by human monocytes: Stimulation by antigen-activated lymphocytes or lymphokines. J. Exp. Med. 145, 1344–1352 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  393. Loblay, R.H., Schroer, J., Rosenthal, A.S.: Attempts of determinant-specific antibody blockade of macrophage presentation. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 87–96 (1980)Google Scholar
  394. Lobo, P.I., Burge, J.J.: In vitro studies on the immune regulatory role of complement receptors (C3) present on human B lymphocytes. Eur. J. Immunol. 12, 682–686 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  395. Löhle, E., Mann, W.: Das hereditäre angioneurotische Ödem. HNO 28, 305–307 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  396. Loirat, C., Buriot, D., Pelties, A.P., Berche, P., Anjard, Y., Griscelli, C., Mathieu, H.: Case report: Fulminant meningococcemia in a child with hereditary deficiency of the seventh component of complement and proteinuria. Acta Paediatr. Scand. 69, 553–557 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  397. Lorenz, W., Doenicke, A., Schöning, B., Ohmann, C., Neugebauer, E.: Definition and classification of the histamine release response to drugs in anaesthesia and surgery: Studies in the conscious human subject. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 896–913 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  398. Lovett, D.H., Ryan, J.L., Sterzel, R.B.: Stimulation of rat mesangial cell proliferation by macrophage interleukin 1. J. Immunol. 131, 2830–2836 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  399. Lundberg, C., Campbell, D., Agerup, B., Ulfendahl, H.: Quantification of the inflammatory reaction and collagen accumulation in an experimental model of open wounds in the rat. Scand. J. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 16, 123–131 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  400. Luskin, A.T., Tobin, M.C.: Alterations of complement components in disease. Am. J. Med. Techn. 48, 749–756 (1982)Google Scholar
  401. Mac Glashan, D.W., Schleimer, R.P., Peters, S.P., Schulman, E.S., Adams, G.K., Sobotka, A.K., Newball, H.H., Lichtenstein, L.M.: Comparative studies of human basophils and mast cells. Fed. Proc. 42, 2504–2509 (1983)Google Scholar
  402. Maderazo, E.G., Ward, P.A., Woronick, C.L., Quintiliani, R.: Partial characterization of a cell-directed inhibitor of leukotaxis in human serum. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 89, 190–199 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  403. Majno, G., Shea, S.M., Lebenthal, M.: Endothelial contraction induced by histamine-type mediators: An electron microscopic study. J. Cell. Biol. 42, 647–672 (1969)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  404. Malech, H.L., Root, R.K., Gallin, J.I.: Structural analysis of human neutrophil migration, centriole, microtubule and microfilament orientation and function during chemotaxis. J. Cell. Biol. 75, 666–693 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  405. Mammen, E.F.: Congenital coagulation disorders. Sem. Thromb. Hemost. 9, 1–72 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  406. Mampaso, F., Ecija, J., Fogne, L., Moneo, I., Gallego, N., Leyva-Cobian, F.: Familial C lqdeficiency in 3 siblings with glomerulonephritis and Rothmund-Thompson Syndrome. Nephron 28, 179–185 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  407. Marceau, F., Barbaré, J., St. Pierre, S., Regoli, D.: Kinin receptors in experimental inflammation. Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol. 58, 536–542 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  408. Marrack, P., Swierkosz, J.E., Kappler, J.W.: The role of antigen-presenting cells in effector helper-T-cell action. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 123–139 (1980)Google Scholar
  409. Marx, J.L.: What do oncogenes do? Science 223, 673–676 (1984)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  410. Mathews, K.P., Pan, P.M., Gardner, N.J., Hugli, T.E.: Familial carboxypeptidase N deficiency. Ann. Int. Med. 93, 443–445 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  411. Maurer, H.R.: Wachstumsregulation durch Chalone. Natürliche Hemmstoffe und ihre medizinisch-pharmazeutische Bedeutung. Munch. med. Wschr. 125, 317–319 (1983)Google Scholar
  412. McConn, R., Haberland, G.L., Frölich, J.C.: The kallikrein-kinin system in circulatory and metabolic homeostasis. World J. Surg. 5, 639–651 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  413. Mc Conn, R., Wasserman, E., Haberland, G.: The kallikrein-kinin system in the acutely-ill: (A) Changes in plasma kininogen in acutely-ill patients, (B) The efficacy of pulmonary clearance of bradykinin. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156B, 1019–1035 (1983)Google Scholar
  414. McGee, M.P., Kreger, A., Leake, E.S., Harshman, S.: Toxicity of staphylococcal alpha-toxin for rabbit alveolar macrophages. Inf. Immun. 39, 439–444 (1983)Google Scholar
  415. Mc Guire, W.W., Spragg, R.G., Cohen, A.B., Cochrane, C.G.: Studies on the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. J. Clin. Invest. 69, 543–553 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  416. Mc Keever, P.E., Spicer, S.S.: Surface receptors of mononuclear phagocytes. In: Carr, I., Daems, W.T., The Reticuloendothelial System, Comprehensive Treatise 1 Morphology. Plenum Press, New York, London, 161–258 (1980)Google Scholar
  417. Mc Manus, L.M., Hanahan, D.J., Pinckard, R.N.: Human platelet stimulation by acetyl glyceryl ether phosphorylcholine. J. Clin. Invest. 67, 903–906 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  418. Mc Phail, L.C., Snyderman, R.: Mechanisms of regulating the respiratory burst in leukocytes. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 247–283 (1984)Google Scholar
  419. Medorf, M., Ilda, K., Mold, C., Nussenzweig, V.: Unique role of the complement receptor CR, in the degradation of C3b associated with immune complexes. J. Exp. Med. 156, 1739–1754 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  420. Meltzner, M.S.: Tumor cytotoxicity by lymphokine-activated macrophages: Development of macrophage tumoricidal activity requires a sequence of reactions. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, 319–343 (1981)Google Scholar
  421. Meltzner, M.S., Occhionero, M., Ruco, L.P.: Macrophage activation for tumor cytotoxicity: Regulatory mechanisms for induction and control of cytotoxic activity. Fed. Proc. 41, 2198–2205 (1982)Google Scholar
  422. Mereteley, K., Room, G., Maini, R.N.: Effect of histamine on the mitogenic response of human lymphocytes and its modification by cimetidine and levamisole. Agents Actions 11, 84–88 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  423. Messmore, H.L.: Natural inhibitors of the coagulation system. Sem. Thromb. Hemost. 8, 267–275 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  424. Metcalf, D.: The control of neutrophil and macrophage production at the progenitor cell level. In: Baum, S.J., Ledney, D.G., Experimental hematology today. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 35–46 (1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  425. Metcalf, D., Burgess, A.W.: Clonal analysis of progenitor cell commitment to granulocyte of macrophage production. J. Cell. Physiol. 111, 275–283 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  426. Metz, S.A.: Anti-inflammatory agents as inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis in man. Med. Clin. North Am. 65, 713–757 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  427. Meuer, S., Ecker, U., Hadding, U., Bitter-Suermann, D.: Platelet-serotonin release by C3a and C5a: Two independent pathways of activation. J. Immunol. 126, 1506–1509 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  428. Meuret, G.: The kinetics of mononuclear phagocytes in man. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 11–22 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  429. Miller, M.E., Oski, F.A., Harris, M.D.: Lazy leukocyte, a new disorder of neutrophil function. Lancet 1, 665–669 (1971)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  430. Millikan, L.E.: Skin anatomy in wound healing. Ear, Nose and Throat J. 60, 10–22 (1981)Google Scholar
  431. Mims, C.A.: Infektion und Abwehr, Auseinandersetzung zwischen Erreger und Makroorganismus. Verlag Gerhard Witzstrock, Baden-Baden, Köln, New York, 3–230 (1981)Google Scholar
  432. Minta, J.O., Movat, H.Z.: The complement system and inflammation. In: Movat, H.Z., Current Topics in Pathology 68, Inflammatory Reaction. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 136–178 (1979)Google Scholar
  433. Minta, J.O., Winkler, C.J., Biggar, W.D., Greenberg, M.: A selective and complete absence of Clq in a patient with vasculitis and nephritis. Clin. Immunol. Immunopathol. 22, 225–237 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  434. Moll, A., Manning, P.A., Timmis, K.N.: Plasmid-determined resistence to serum bactericidal activity: A major outer membrane protein, the tra-T-Gene product, is responsible for plasmid-specified serum resistence in Escherichia coli. Inf. Immun. 28, 359–367 (1980)Google Scholar
  435. Moncada, S.: The role of prostacyclin and thromboxane A, in the regulation of platelet behaviour. Materia Medica Polona 12, 207–212 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  436. Moncada, S., Gryglewski, R., Buntling, S., Vane, J.R.: An enzyme isolated from arteries transforms prostaglandin endoperoxides to an unstable substance that inhibits platelet aggregation. Nature 263, 663–665 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  437. Moore, M.A.S.: Humoral regulation of granulopoiesis. Clinics in Haematology 8, 287–309 (1979a)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  438. Moore, M.A.S.: Regulatory interactions in normal and leukemic myelopoiesis. In: Neth, C.R., Gallo, R.C., Hofschneider, P.H., Mannweiler, K., Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Modern Trends in Human Leukemia III, Newest Results in Clinical and Biological Research. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 171–179 (1979b)Google Scholar
  439. Moore, R.N., Hoffeld, J.T., Farrar, J.J., Mergenhagen, S.E., Oppenheim, J.J., Shadduck, R.K.: Role of colony-stimulating factors as primary regulators of macrophage functions. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 119–148 (1981)Google Scholar
  440. Moorthy, A.V., Pringle, D.: Urticaria, vasculitis, hypocomplementemia, and immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 106, 68–70 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  441. Morahan, P.S.: Editorial: Macrophage nomenclature: Where are we going ? J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 27, 223–245 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  442. Morgan, E.L., Weigle, W.O., Hugli, T.E.: Anaphylatoxin-mediated regulation of the immune response, I. C3a-mediated suppression of human and murine humoral immune response. J. Exp. Med. 155, 1412–1426 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  443. Morgan, E.L., Thoman, M.L., Weigle, W.O., Hugli, T.E.: Anaphylatoxin-mediated regulation of the immune response, II. C 5a-mediated enhancement of human humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses. J. Immunol. 130, 1257–1261 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  444. Morley, J.: Role of prostaglandins secreted by macrophages in the inflammatory process. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 377–394 (1981)Google Scholar
  445. Morley. J., Bray, M.A., Jones, R.W.: Prostaglandin and thromboxan production by human and guinea-pig macrophages and leukocytes. Prostaglandines 17, 730–736 (1979)Google Scholar
  446. Mosher, D.F., Proctor, R.A., Grossmann, J.E.: Fibronectin: Role in inflammation. In: Weissman, G., Advances in Inflammation Research 2. Raven Press, New York, 187–207 (1981)Google Scholar
  447. Moss, J., Philbin, D.M., Rosow, C.E., Basta, S.J., Gelb, C., Sawarese, J.J.: Histamine release by neuromuscular agents in man. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 891–895 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  448. Mosser, D.M., Edelson, P.J.: Mechanism of microbial entry and endocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 71–96 (1984)Google Scholar
  449. Movat, H.Z.: The kinin system: Its relation to blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and the formed elements of the blood. Rev. Physiol. Biochem. Pharmacol. 84, 143–202 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  450. Movat, H.Z.: The acute inflammatory reaction. In: Movat, H.Z., Inflammation, Immunity, Hypersensitivity. Harper & Row Publishers, 2–161 (1979a)Google Scholar
  451. Movat, H.Z.: The kinin system and its relation to other systems. In: Movat, H.Z., Current Topics in Pathology 68, Inflammatory Reaction. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 111–134 (1979b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  452. Muller, H.K.: Mechanisms of clearing injured tissue. In: Glynn, L.C., Tissue Repair and Regeneration, Handbook of Inflammation 3. Elsevier/North-Holland, Biochemical Press, Amsterdam, 145–175 (1981)Google Scholar
  453. Müller, H.-M., Overlack, A., Stumpe, K.O., Kolloch, R., Ressel, C.: Increased prostaglandin Ez excretion with oral kallikrein treatment in hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 1105–1110 (1983)Google Scholar
  454. Müller, P., Kather, H., Dammann, H.-G., Simon, B.: Heilen Prostaglandine in niedriger zytoprotektiver Dosierung peptische Ulzera? Winch. med. Wschr. 124, 93–94 (1982)Google Scholar
  455. Mundy, G.R.: Control of osteoclast function by lymphokines in health and disease. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 4. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 395–408 (1981)Google Scholar
  456. Murray, H.W.: Macrophage activation: Enhanced oxidative and antiprotozoal activity. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 97–115 (1984)Google Scholar
  457. Murray, H.W., Cohn, Z.A.: Mononuclear phagocyte antimicrobial and antitumor activity: The role of oxygen intermediates. J. Invest. Derm. 74, 285–288 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  458. Mustard, J., Packham, A.A.: The reaction of the blood to injury. In: Movat, H.Z., Inflammation, Immunity, Hypersensitivity, Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms. Harper & Row Publishers, 558–664 (1979)Google Scholar
  459. Myers, S., Castor, C.W.: Connective tissue activation: Identification of CTAP-PMN. Clin. Res. 26, 715A (1978)Google Scholar
  460. Naccache, P.H., Showell, H.J., Becker, E.L., Sha’afi, R.I.: Changes in ionic movements across rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte membrane during lysosomal enzyme release. J. Cell. Biol. 75, 635–649 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  461. Nachman, R.L., Polley, M.: The platelet as an inflammatory cell. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 169–173 (1979)Google Scholar
  462. Nadal, G.: Control of liver growth by inhibitors (chalones). Arch. Toxicol. Suppl. 2, 131–142 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  463. Nadal, G., Lombard, M.N., Zajdela, F.: Inhibition of rat hepatocyte multiplication by serum and liver factors: Physiological development and experimental induction. Virchows Arch. Abt. B Cell. Path. 20, 277–285 (1976)Google Scholar
  464. Nakahata, T., Ogawa, M.: Clonal origin of murine hemopoietic colonies with apparent restriction to granulocyte-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GMM) differentiation. J. Cell. Physiol. 111, 239–246 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  465. Nariuchi, H., Kakiuchi, T.: Antibody responses to various T-independent antigens of B-cells with or without C 3-receptors and adherent cell requirement for these responses. J. Immunol. 128, 161–167 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  466. Nathan, C.F.: Secretion of oxygen intermediates: Role in effector functions of activated macrophages. Fed. Proc. 41, 2206–2211 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  467. Nathan, C.F., Brukner, L.H., Silverstein, S.C., Cohn, Z.A.: Extracellular cytolysis by activated macrophages and granulocytes, I. Pharmacologic triggering of effector cells and the release of hydrogen peroxide. J. Exp. Med. 149, 84–99 (1979a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  468. Nathan, C.F., Silverstein, S.C., Brukner, L.H., Cohn, Z.A.: Extracellular cytolysis by activated macrophages and granulocytes. II. Hydrogen peroxide as a mediator of cytotoxicity. J. Exp. Med. 149, 100–113 (1979b)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  469. Nathan, C.F., Murray, H.W., Wiebe, M.E., Rubin, B.Y.: Identification of interferon-gamma, as the lymphokine that activates human macrophage oxidative metabolism and antimicrobial activity. J. Exp. Med. 158, 670–689 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  470. Naum, Y.: Macrophage growth factor. In: Glynn, L.E., Houck, J.C., Weissmann, G., Handbook of Inflammation I, Chemical messengers of the Inflammatory Process. Elsevier/North Holland Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, 285–316 (1979)Google Scholar
  471. Neter, E.: Enteropathogenicity: Recent developments. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 699–701 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  472. Newball, H.H., Lichtenstein, L.M.: Mast cells and basophils: Effector cells of inflammatory disorders in the lung. Thorax 36, 721–725 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  473. Newman, S.L., Musson, R.A., Henson, P.M.: Development of functional complement receptors during in vitro maturation of human monocytes into macrophages. J. Immunol. 125, 2236–2244 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  474. Nichols, B.A., Bainton, D.F.: Ultrastructure and cytochemistry of mononuclear phagocytes. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes in Immunity, Infection and Pathology. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, London, Edinburgh, Melbourne, 17–56 (1975)Google Scholar
  475. Niskanen, E., Tyler, W.S., Symann, M., Stohlmann, F., Howard, B.: The effect of neutropenia on the cell cycle of granulocyte precursors in an in vivo culture system. Blood 43, 23–31 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  476. Nogueira, N., Cohn, Z.A.: Activation of mononuclear phagocytes for the destruction of intracellular parasites: Studies with Trypanosoma cruzi. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 117–126 (1984)Google Scholar
  477. Oelz, O.: Die klinische Bedeutung der Prostaglandine und anderer Arachidonsäuremetaboliten, Prostazyklin (PGI0), Thromboxan A,, Leukotriene. Therapeutische Umschau 39, 751–758 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  478. O’Flaherty, J.T., Ward, P.A.: Leukocyte aggregation induced by chemotactic factors. A review. Inflammation 3, 177–194 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  479. Ogata, R.T., Levine, R.P.: Characterization of complement resistance in Escherichia coli conferred by the antibiotic resistence plasmid R100. J. Immunol. 125, 1494–1498 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  480. Ogden, B.E., Hill, H.R.: Histamine regulates lymphocyte mitogenic responses through activation of specific H, and H, histamine receptors. Immunology 41, 107–114 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  481. O’Hare, R.P., Fallon, A., Bradley, J.F., Burns, J., Mc Gee, J.: Isolation of collagen stimulating factors from healing wounds. J. Clin. Pathol. 36, 707–711 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  482. Ohlsson, F., Balldin, G., Lasson, A.: Trypsin-induced release of bradykinin and of C 3 fragments in man: Clinical and experimental studies on the protective role of alpha-2-macroglobulin and Aprotinin. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 1083–1098 (1983)Google Scholar
  483. Ohlsson, K.: Interaction of granulocyte neutral proteases with alpha,-antitrypsin, alpha,macroglobulin and alpha,-antichymotrypsin. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Pro-teases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. UTB, Baltimore, München, 167–177 (1978a)Google Scholar
  484. Ohlsson, K.: Purification and properties of granulocyte collagenase and elastase. In: Have-mann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. UTB, Baltimore, München, 89–101 (1978b)Google Scholar
  485. Ohlsson, K., Olsson, I.: The neutral proteases of human granulocytes. Isolation and partial characterization of granulocyte elastases. Eur. J. Biochem. 42, 519–527 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  486. Ohlsson, K., Olsson, I., Spitznagel, J.K.: Localization of chymotrypsin-like cationic protein, collagenase and elastase in azurophil granules of human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Hoppe-Seyler’s Z. Physiol. Chem. 358, 361–366 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  487. Olsson, I., Venge, P.: The role of the human neutrophil in the inflammatory reaction. Allergy 35, 1–13 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  488. Oppenheim, J.J., Moore, R., Gmelig-Myeling, F., Togawa, A., Wahl, S., Mathieson, B.J., Dougherty, S., Carter, C.: Role of cytokine and endotoxin induced monokines in lymphocyte proliferation, differentiation, and immunglobulin production. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 379–398 (1980)Google Scholar
  489. Oppenheim, J.J., Stadler, B.M., Siraganian, R.P., Mage, M., Mathieson, B.: Lymphokines: Their role in lymphocyte responses, Properties of interleukin 1. Fed. Proc. 41, 257–262 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  490. Orredson, S.U., Knighton, D.R., Scheuenstuhl, H., Hunt, T.K.: A qualitative in vitro study of fibroblast and endothelial cell migration in response to serum and wound fluid. J. Surg. Res. 35, 249–258 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  491. Overlack, A., Stumpe, K.O., Kühnert, M., Kolloch, R., Ressel, C., Heck, I., Krück, F.: Evidence for participation of kinins in the antihypertensive effect of converting enzyme inhibition. Klin. Wochenschr. 59, 69–74 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  492. Owen, D.A.A., Farrington, H.E.: Inflammation and the vascular changes due to thermal injury in rat hind paws. Agents Actions 6, 622–626 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  493. Owen, D.A.A., Poy, E., Woodward, D.F.: Evaluation of the role of histamine H,- and HZ-receptors in cutaneous inflammation in the guinea pig produced by histamine and mast cell degranulation. Br. J. Pharmacol. 69, 615–623 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  494. Owen, D.A.A., Harvey, C.A., Boyce, M.J.: Effects of histamine on the circulatory system. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 972–977 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  495. Page, R.C., Davies, P., Allison, A.C.: The macrophage as a secretory cell. Int. Rev. Cytol. 52, 119–157 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  496. Pangburn, M.K.: Activation of complement via the alternative pathway. Fed. Proc. 42, 139–143 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  497. Pangburn, M.K., Schreiber, R.D., Trombold, J.S., Müller-Eberhard, H.J.: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: Deficiency in factor H-like functions of the abnormal erythrocyts. J. Exp. Med. 157, 1971–1980 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  498. Parker, C.W., Stenson, W.F., Huber, M.G., Kelly, J.P.: Formation of thromboxane B2and hydroxyarachidonic acids in purified human lymphocytes in the presence and absence of PHA. J. Immunol. 122, 1572–1577 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  499. Parker, J.W., Metcalf, D.: Production of colony-stimulating factor in mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte cultures. J. Immunol. 112, 502–510 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  500. Paton, J.C., Ferrante, A.: Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte respiratory burst, bactericidal activity and migration by pneumolysin. Inf. Immun. 41, 1212–1216 (1983)Google Scholar
  501. Pavek, K., Wegmann, A., Nordström, L., Schwander, D.: Cardiovascular and respiratory mechanisms in anaphylactic and anaphylactoid shock reaction. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 941–947 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  502. Peacock, E.E.: Collagenolysis: The other side of the equation. World J. Surg. 4, 297–302 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  503. Pedata, F., Del Bianco, P.L., Curradi, C., Anselmi, B., Sicuteri, F.: Histamine and kallikrein system in man. Agent Actions Suppl. 6, 229–233 (1979)Google Scholar
  504. Pelus, L.M., Broxmeyer, H.E., Moore, M.A.S.: Regulation of human myelopoiesis by prostaglandin E and lactoferrin. Cell Tissue Kinet. 14, 515–526 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  505. Perez, H.D., Goldstein, I.M.: Regulation of the biologic activity of C5-derived peptides. In: Weissmann, G., Advances in Inflammation Research 2. Raven Press, New York, 1–19 (1981)Google Scholar
  506. Perez, H.D., Lipton, M., Goldstein, I.M.: A specific inhibitor of complement (C 5)-derived chemotactic activity in serum from patients with systemic lupus erythematodes. J. Clin. Invest. 62, 29–38 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  507. Perez, H.D., Goldstein, I.M., Webster, R.O., Henson, P.M.: Enhancement of the chemotactic activity of human C5a-desarg by an anionic polypeptid (“Cochemotaxin”) in normal serum and plasma. J. Immunol. 126, 800–804 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  508. Perontka, S.J., Snyder, S.H.: Multiple serotonin receptors and their physiological significance. Fed. Proc. 42, 213–218 (1983)Google Scholar
  509. Picker, L.J., Raff, H.V., Goldyne, M.E., Stobo, J.D.: Metabolic heterogeneity among human monocytes and its modulation by PGE2. J. Immunol. 124, 2557–2562 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  510. Pierce, C.W.: Macrophages: Modulators of immunity. Am. J. Pathol. 98, 10–28 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  511. Piessens, W.F., Churchill, W.H., Sharma, S.D.: On the killing of syngeneic tumor cells by guinea pig macrophages activated in vitro with lymphocyte mediators. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 293–318 (1981)Google Scholar
  512. Pike, M.C., Snydermann, R.: Requirement of transmethylation reactions for immune effector function. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 423–444 (1981a)Google Scholar
  513. Pike, M.C., Snydermann, R.: Transmethylation reactions are required for initial morphologic and biochemical responses of human monocytes to chemoattractants. J. Immunol. 127, 1444–1449 (1981b)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  514. Pike, M.C., Kredich, N.M., Snyderman, R.: Requirement of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-mediated methylation for human monocyte chemotaxis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3928–3932 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  515. Pike, M.C., Kredich, N.M., Snyderman, R.: Phospholipid methylation in macrophages is inhibited by chemotactic factors. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 2922–2926 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  516. Pinckard, R.N.: The “New chemical mediators of inflammation”. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufman, N., Current Topics in Inflammation and Infection 3. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, London, 38–53 (1982)Google Scholar
  517. Piper, P.J., Samhoun, M.N., Tippins, J.R., Morris, H.R., Taylor, G.W.: Slow-reacting substances and their formation by a lipoxygenase pathway. Agents Actions 10, 541–547 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  518. Plow, E.F., Edington, T.S.: The fibrinolytic pathway of leukocytes. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 330–345 (1978)Google Scholar
  519. Plummer, T.H., Hurwitz, M.Y.: Human plasma carboxypeptidase N. J. Biol. Chem. 253, 3907–3912 (1978)Google Scholar
  520. Polverini, P.J., Cotran, R.S., Gimbrone, M.A., Unanue, E.R.: Activated macrophages induce vascular proliferation. Nature 269, 804–806 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  521. Postlethwaite, A.E., Kang, A.H.: Collagen-and collagen peptide-induced chemotaxis of human blood monocytes. J. Exp. Med. 143, 1299–1307 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  522. Postlethwaite, A.E., Kang, A.H.: Induction of fibroblast proliferation by human mononuclear leukocyte-derived proteins. Arthr. Rheum. 26, 22–27 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  523. Powanda, M.C., Moyer, E.D.: Plasma proteins and wound healing. Surg. Gynec., Obstetr. 153, 749–755 (1981)Google Scholar
  524. Punter, J.: Tumorgene, neuer Ansatzpunkt für Krebstherapie? Munch. med. Wschr. 40, 860–864 (1983)Google Scholar
  525. Puri, J., Lonai, P.: Mechanisms of antigen binding by T-cells: H-2 (Ia)-restricted binding of antigen plus la by helper cells. Eur. J. Immunol. 10, 273–281 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  526. Quesenberry, P., Morley, A., Stohlmann, F., Rickard, K., Howard, D., Smith, M.: Effect of endotoxin on granulopoiesis and colony-stimulating factor. N. Engl. J. Med. 286, 227–232 (1972)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  527. Quesenberry, P.J., Morley, A., Miller, M., Rickard, K., Howard, D., Stohlman, F.: Effect of en- dotoxin on granulopoiesis and the in vitro colony-forming cell. Blood 41, 391–398 (1973)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  528. Rabes, H.M., Tuczek, H.U.: Quantitative autoradiographische Untersuchungen zur Heterogenität der Leberzellproliferation nach partieller Hepatektomie. Virchows Arch. B. Cell. Path. 6, 302–312 (1970)Google Scholar
  529. Rachmilewitz, M., Rachmilewitz, B., Chaonat, M., Zlotnik, H., Schlesinger, M.: The mononuclear phagocyte system and hemopoiesis. In: Cohen, S., Pick, E., Oppenheim, J.H., Biology of the Lymphokines A. Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, London, 419–431 (1979)Google Scholar
  530. Ratnoff, O.D., Pensky, J., Ogston, D., Naff, G.B.: The inhibition of plasmin, plasma kallikrein, plasma permeability factor, and the C’Ir subcomponent of the first component of complement by serum C’1 esterase inhibitor. J. Exp. Med. 129, 315–329 (1969)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  531. Reinhardt, D., Borchard, U.: H,-receptor antagonists: Comparative pharmacology and clinical use. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 983–990 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  532. Robbins, S.L., Angell, M., Kumar, V.: Basic Pathology, Chapter 2: Inflammation and repair. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, London, Toronto, Sydney, 28–61 (1981)Google Scholar
  533. Roberts, R.L., Nath, J., Friedman, M.M., Gallin, J.I.: Effect of taxol on human neutrophils. Fed. Proc. 42, 2853–2854 (1983)Google Scholar
  534. Robinson, W.A.: White blood cell interaction in granulocyte regulation. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 24, 583–587 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  535. Roblin, R.O., Hammond, M.E., Bensky, N.D., Dvorak, A.M., Dvorak, H.F., Black, P.H.: Generation of macrophage migration inhibitory activity by plasminogen activators. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 1570–1574 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  536. Rocklin, R.E.: Products of activated lymphocytes: Leukocytes inhibitory factor (LIF) distinct from migration inhibitory factor (MIF). J. Immunol. 112, 1416–1466 (1974)Google Scholar
  537. Rocklin, R.E.: Modulation of cellular-immune responses in vivo and in vitro by histamine receptor-bearing lymphocytes. J. Clin. Invest. 57, 1051–1058 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  538. Rohatgi, P.K.: Serum angiotensin converting enzyme in pulmonary disease. Lung 160, 287–301 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  539. Rohrbach, R.: Zur Steuerung der Zellproliferation durch Chalone. In: Büngeler, W., Eder, M., Lennert, K., Peters, G., Sandritter, W., Seifert, G., Veröffentlichungen aus der Pathologie, 99. Fischer, Stuttgart (1975)Google Scholar
  540. Roos, D., Weening, R.S., Voetman, A.A.: Protection of human neutrophils against oxidative damage. Agents Actions 10, 528–535 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  541. Root, R.K., Beeson, P.B.: Genetic disorders of leukocyte function: What they tell us about normal antimicrobial mechanisms of human phagocytic cells. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 731–734 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  542. Rosen, H., Klebanoff, S.J.: Bactericidal activity of a superoxide anion-generating system, A model for the polymorphonuclear leucocyte. J. Exp. Med. 149, 27–39 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  543. Rosenwasser, L.J., Rosenthal, A.S.: Adherent cell function in murine T lymphocyte antigen recognition, I. A macrophage-dependent T cell proliferation assay in the mouse. J. Immunol. 120, 1991–1995 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  544. Ross, G.D.: Structure and function of membrane complement receptors. Fed. Proc. 41, 3089–3093 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  545. Ross, G.D., Lambris, J.D.: Identification of a C3b1-specific membrane complement receptor that is expressed on lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, and erythrocytes. J. Exp. Med. 155, 96–110 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  546. Ross, R.: Fibroblast proliferation induced by blood cells. Agents Actions 7, 81–84 (1980)Google Scholar
  547. Ross, R., Kariya, B., Vogel, A., Raines, E.: Cell proliferation: Platelet and macrophage-derived growth factor. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 183–187 (1979)Google Scholar
  548. Roth, S.L., Martini, G.A., Havemann, K., Adler, G.: Hepatopathie im Kindes-und Erwachsenenalter bei Alpha-l -Antitrypsin-Mangel. In: Ergebnisse der Inneren Medizin und Kinderheilkunde 46, 37–73 (1981)Google Scholar
  549. Rudolph, R.: Contraction and the control of contraction. World J. Surg. 4, 279–287 (1980)Google Scholar
  550. Russo, M.: The role of macrophages in the chemotactic response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 164, 326–330 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  551. Ryan, J.W., Ryan, U.S., Chung, A., Fisher, G.H.: Metabolism of bradykinin by endothelial cells in culture. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 775–781 (1983)Google Scholar
  552. Rytömaa, T.: The chalone concept. Int. Rev. Exp. Path. 16, 155–206 (1976)Google Scholar
  553. Saito, H., Ratnoff, O.D.: Interactions among Hageman factor (HG, Factor XII), plasma thromboplastin antecedant (PTA, Factor XI), plasma prekallikrein (PK, Fletcher factor) and high molecular weight kininogen (HMW-K, Fitzgerald factor) in blood coagulation. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 120B, 61–70 (1979)Google Scholar
  554. Salvesen, G., Virca, G.D., Travis, J.: Interaction of plasma kallikrein with proteinase inhibitors. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156a, 121–130 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  555. Samuelsson, B., Hammarström, S., Murphy, R.C., Borgeat, P.: Leukotriens and slow reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A). Allergy. 35, 375–381 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  556. Sano, Y., Nishimukai, H., Kitamura, H., Nagaki, K., Inai, S., Hamasaki, Y., Marnyama, I., Igata, A.: Hereditary deficiency of the third component of complement in two sisters with systemic lupus erythematodes-like symptoms. Arthr. Rheum. 24, 1255–1260 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  557. Sawai, K., Niwa, S., Katori, M.: The significant reduction of high molecular weight-kininogen in synovial fluid of patients with acute rheumatoid arthritis. Adv. Exp. Med. Bio. 120B, 195–202 (1979)Google Scholar
  558. Schaefer, H.E.: The role of macrophages in atherosclerosis. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 137–142 (1981a)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  559. Schaefer, H.E.: The role of macrophages in storage diseases. In: Schmalz, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 121–130 (1981b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  560. Schaefer, H.E., Assmann, G.: Bedeutung der Makrophagen für die Genese der Arteriosklerose. Münch. med. Wschr. 122, Suppl. 5, 228–238 (1980)Google Scholar
  561. Schapira, M., James, A., Scott, C.F., Kueppers, F., James, H.L., Cohen, A.B., Colman, R.W.: Role of high molecular weight kininogen in modulating the inactivation of human plasma kallikrein by plasma protease inhibitors. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156a, 131–141 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  562. Schiffmann, E., Corcoran, B.A., Wahl, S.M.: Formylmethionyl peptides as chemoattractants for leukocytes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 1059–1062 (1975)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  563. Schlick, E., Freundt, K.J.: Pharmakologische Grundlagen der medikamentösen Gerinnungshemmung. Zeitschrift für Allgemeinmedizin 57, 915–923 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  564. Schmidt, M.E., Douglas, S.D., Quie, P., Nelson, R.D., Schmidt, W., Havemann, K.: Effect of neutral granulocyte proteases on human immuncompetent cells: Action of elastase-like protease and chymotrypsin-like protease on mononuclear phagocytes. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 298–305 (1978)Google Scholar
  565. Schmidt, J.A., Mizel, S.B., Cohen, D., Green, I.: Interleukin 1, a potential regulator of fibroblast proliferation. J. Immunol. 128, 2177–2182 (1982a)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  566. Schmidt, J.A., Oliver, C.N., Green, I., Gery, I.: Silica stimulated macrophages release a fibroblast proliferation factor identical to interleukin 1 (IL-1). Fed. Proc. 41, 438 (1982b)Google Scholar
  567. Schmitt, M., Mussel, H.-H., Dierich, M.P.: Qualitative and quantitative assessment of C 3-receptor reactivities on lymphoid and phagocytic cells. J. Immunol. 126, 2042–2047 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  568. Schnaper, H.W., Aune, T.M., Pierce, C.W.: Suppressor T cell activation by human leukocyte interferon. J. Immunol. 131, 2301–2306 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  569. Schnyder, J.: Biochemical properties of human and murine mononuclear phagocytes and their changes on activation. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyt Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 23–30 (1981)Google Scholar
  570. Schnyder, J., Baggiolini, M.: Secretion of lysosomal hydrolases by stimulated and nonstimulated macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 148, 435–450 (1978a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  571. Schnyder, J., Baggiolini, M.: Role of phagocytosis in the activation of macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 148, 1449–1457 (1987b)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  572. Schorlemmer, H.U.: The role of complement in the function of the monocyte/macrophage system. In: Schmalzl, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyte Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 49–61 (1981)Google Scholar
  573. Schorlemmer, H.U., Ferluga, J., Allison, A.C.: Interactions of macrophages and complement components in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. In: Willoughby, D.A., Giroud, J.P., Perspectives in Inflammation. MTP-Press, Lancaster Engl., 191–209 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  574. Schorlemmer, H.U., Kist, M., Bredit, W.: Mycoplasma stimulate mouse peritoneal macrophages to secrete lysosomal enzymes and to be cytotoxic. In: Willoughby, D.A., Giroud, J.P., Inflammation, Mechanisms and Treatment. MTP Press Lancaster Engl., 805–811 (1980)Google Scholar
  575. Schreiber, R.D., Morrison, D.C., Podack, E.R., Müller-Eberhard, H.J.: Bactericidal activity of the alternative complement pathway generated from 11 isolated plasma proteins. J. Exp. Med. 149, 870–882 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  576. Schreiber, R.D., Pangburn, M.K., Bjorson, A.B., Brothers, M.A., Müller-Eberhard, H.J.: The role of C3 fragments in endocytosis and extracellular cytotoxic reactions by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Clin. Immunol. Immunpathol. 23, 335–357 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  577. Schur, P.H.: Complement and lupus erythematodes. Arthr. Rheum. 25, 793–798 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  578. Schweisfurth, H.: Das Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzym bei verschiedenen Erkrankungen. Med. Welt 31, 1758–1759 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  579. Schweisfurth, H.: Das Angiotensin-I-Converting-Enzym, Physiologische Aspekte und klinische Bedeutung. Dtsch. med. Wschr. 107, 1815–1818 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  580. Schweisfurth, H., Wernze, H.: Changes in Angiotensin-I-converting-enzyme in patients with viral hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Acta Hepato-Gastroenterologica 26, 207–210 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  581. Scott, W.A., Ronzer, C.A., Cohn, Z.A.: Leukotriene C release by macrophages. Fed. Proc. 42, 129–133 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  582. Sharma, J.N., Watson Buchanan, W.: Kinin system in clinical and experimental rheumatoid inflammation: A short review. Current Medical Research and Opinion 6, 314–321 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  583. Shevach, E.: The role of antigenic determinants in macrophage-T lymphocyte interactions. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 59–72 (1980a)Google Scholar
  584. Shevach, E.M.: The role of the major histocompatibility complex in the regulation of macrophage-T lymphocyte interaction. J. Invest. Derm. 74, 289–291 (1980b)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  585. Shimada, T., Sugo, T., Kato, H., Iwanaga, S.: Role of HMW-kininogen on surface-mediated activation of factor XII. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, New York and London, 73–85 (1983)Google Scholar
  586. Showell, H.J., Freer, R.J., Zigmond, S.H., Schiffmann, E., Aswanikumar, S., Corcoran, B., Becker, E.: The structure—activity relations of synthetic peptides as chemotactic factors and inducers of lysosomal enzyme secretion for neutrophils. J. Exp. Med. 143, 1154–1169 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  587. Shulman, L.N., Robinson, S.H.: Transition from granulocyte to macrophage predominance in bone marrow cultures. Br. J. Haematol. 54, 405–414 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  588. Siegel, J.N., Schwartz, A., Askenase, P.W., Gershan, R.K.: T-cell suppression and contrasuppression induced by histamine H, and H, receptor agonists, respectively. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 5052–5056 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  589. Silberberg, A.: Microcirculation and the extravascular space. Bibliotheca anatomica 17, 54–65 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  590. Silverberg, M., Kaplan, A.P.: Activation of Hageman factor. In: Weissmann, G., Advances in Inflammation Research 2. Raven Press, New York, 165–185 (1981)Google Scholar
  591. Silverblatt, F.J.: Host—parasite interaction in the rat renal pelvis, A possible role for pili in the pathogenesis of pyelonephritis. J. Exp. Med. 140, 1696–1711 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  592. Silverblatt, F.J., Ofek, I.: Interaction of bacterial pili and leukocytes. Infection 11, 235–238 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  593. Silverstein, S.C., Loike, J.D.: Phagocytosis. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes Function Aspects Part I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 895–917 (1980)Google Scholar
  594. Silverstein, E., Fierst, S.M., Simon, M.R., Weinstock, J.V., Friedland, J.: Angiotensin-converting enzyme in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 75, 175–178 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  595. Sissons, J.G.P., Schreiber, R.D., Cooper, N.R., Oldstone, M.B.A.: The role of antibody and complement in lysing virus-infected cells. Med. Microbiol. Immunol. 170, 221–227 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  596. Sklar, L.A., Jesaitis, A.J., Painter, R.G.: The neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor: Dynamics of ligand—receptor interactions and their relationship to cellular responses. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14. Plenum Press, New York, London, 29–82 (1984)Google Scholar
  597. Sluiter, W., van Waarde, D., Hulsing-Hesselink, E., Elzenga-Claasen, Ine, L., van Furth, R.: Humoral control of monocyte production during inflammation. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 325–339 (1980)Google Scholar
  598. Smith, J.B., Ingerman, C., Kocsis, J.J., Silver, M.J.: Formation of prostaglandins during the aggregation of human blood platelets. J. Clin. Invest. 52, 965–969 (1973)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  599. Smith, K.A., Lachman, L.B., Oppenheim, J.J., Favata, M.F.: The functional relationship of the interleukins. J. Exp. Med. 151, 1551–1556 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  600. Smith, M.J.H.: Biological activities of leukotrien B,. Agents Actions 11, 571–572 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  601. Smith-Erichsen, N., Aasen, A.O., Amundsen, E.: The functional inhibition of kallikrein, A critical factor in septic shock. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156 B, 1049–1054 (1983)Google Scholar
  602. Smolen, J.E., Weissmann, G.: The granulocyte: Metabolic properties and mechanisms of lysosomal enzyme release. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 56–76 (1978)Google Scholar
  603. Smolen, J.E., Korchak, H.M., Weissmann, G.: Increased levels of cyclic adenosine-3’,5’-monophosphate in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after surface stimulation. J. Clin. Invest. 65, 1077–1085 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  604. Snyderman, R.: Characterization of the oligopeptide chemoattractant receptor on leukocytes: Binding affinity reflects signal transduction. Fed. Proc. 42, 2855–2856 (1983)Google Scholar
  605. Snyderman, R., Fudman, E.J.: Demonstration of a chemotactic factor receptor on macrophages. J. Immunol. 124, 2754–2757 (1980)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  606. Snyderman, R., Pike, M.C.: Transductional mechanisms of chemoattractant receptors on leukocytes. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 1–28 (1984)Google Scholar
  607. Sobermann, R.J., Karnovsky, M.L.: Biochemical properties of activated macrophages. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 11–31 (1981)Google Scholar
  608. Solomkin, J.S., Jenkins, M.K., Nelson, R.D., Chenoweth, D., Simmons, R.L.: Neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis II. Evidence for the role of complement activation products in cellular deactivation. Surgery 90, 319–327 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  609. Sorg, C., Neumann, C.: A developmental concept for the heterogeneity of macrophages in response to lymphokines and other signals. In: Pick, E., Lymphokines 3. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 85–118 (1981)Google Scholar
  610. Soter, N.A., Austen, F.: Urticaria, angioedema, and mediator release in humans in response to physical environmental stimuli. Fed. Proc. 36, 1736–1741 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  611. Spector, W.G.: The macrophage and its derivatives. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, K., Advances in Inflammation Research 1. Raven Press, New York, 113–116 (1979)Google Scholar
  612. Spector, W.G.: Die Morphologie, Kinetik und Schicksal der Granulome. Verh. Dtsch. Ges. Path. 64, 21–24 (1980)Google Scholar
  613. Spitznagel, J.K.: Nonoxidative antimicrobial reactions of leukocytes. In: Snyderman, R., Con- temporary Topics in Immunology 14. Plenum Press, New York, London, 283–343 (1984)Google Scholar
  614. Springer, T.A., Unkeless, J.C.: Analysis of macrophage differentiation and function with monoclonal antibodies. In: Adams, D.O., Hanna Jr., M.G., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 13, Macrophage Activation. Plenum Press, New York, London, 1–31 (1984)Google Scholar
  615. Stadecker, M.J., Calderon, J., Karnovsky, M.L., Unanue, E.R.: Synthesis and release in thymidine by macrophages. J. Immunol. 119, 1738–1743 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  616. Stadler, B.M., Bernstein, E.H., Siraganian, R.P., Oppenheim, J.J.: Monoclonal antibody against human interleukin 2 (IL-2) I. Purification of IL-2 for the production of monoclonal anti-bodys. J. Immunol. 128, 1620–1624 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  617. Stanley, E.R., Guilbert, L.J.: Regulation of macrophage production by a colony-stimulating factor. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 417–433 (1980)Google Scholar
  618. Steinmann, R.M., Nogueira, N., Witmer, M.D., Tydings, J.D., Mellman, I.S.: Lymphokine enhances the expression and synthesis of Ia-antigens on cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 152, 1248–1261 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  619. Stewart, R.J., Duley, J.A., Rosman, I., Fraser, R., Allardyce, R.A.: The wound fibroblast and macrophage I: Wound cell population changes observed in tissue culture. Br. J. Surg. 68, 125–128 (1981a)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  620. Stewart, R.J., Duley, J.A., Dewdney, J., Allardyce, R.A., Beard, M.E.J., Fitzgerald, P.H.: The wound fibroblast and macrophage II: Their origin studied in a human after bone marrow transplantation. Br. J. Surg. 68, 129–131 (1981b)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  621. Stingl, G., Tamaki, K., Katz, S.I.: Origin and function of epidermal Langerhans cells. Immunological Review 53, 149–174 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  622. Stobo, J.D., Kennedy, M.S., Goldyne, M.E.: Prostaglandin E modulation of the mitogenic response of human T-cells. Differentiation response of T-cell subpopulations. J. Clin. Invest. 64, 1188–1195 (1979)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  623. Stojan, B.: Komplement (C3)-aktivierendes Material in der Gelenkflüssigkeit von Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis. Z. Rheumatol. 40, 208–212 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  624. Stossel, T.P.: The mechanism of leukocyte locomotion. In: Gallin, J.I., Quie, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis. Raven Press, New York, 143–160 (1978)Google Scholar
  625. Stossel, T.P., Hartwig, J.H.: Interaction of actin-myosin and a new actin-binding protein of rabbit pulmonary macrophages: Role in cytoplasmic movement and phagocytosis. J. Cell. Biol. 68, 602–619 (1976)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  626. Sueishi, K., Nanno, S., Tanaka, K.: Permeability enhancing and chemotactic activities of lower molecular weight degradation products of human fibrinogen. Thrombos. Haemostas. 45, 90–94 (1981)Google Scholar
  627. Sullivan, J.: The role of eosinophils in inflammatory reactions. In: Elmer, B., Brown, M.D., Progress in Hematology. Grune and Stratton, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 65–82 (1979)Google Scholar
  628. Sundsmo, J.S.: The leukocyte complement system. Fed. Proc. 41, 3094–3098 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  629. Tabin, C.I., Bradley, S.M., Bargmann, C.I., Weinberg, R.A., Papageorgi, A.G., Screnick, E.M., Lowy, D.R., Chang, E.H.: Mechanism of activation of a human oncogene. Nature 300, 143–149 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  630. Tada, T., Takemori, T., Okumura, K., Nonaka, M., Tokuhisa, T.: Two distinct types of helper T cells involved in the secondary antibody response: Independant and synergistic effects of Ia-and Ia+ helper T cells. J. Exp. Med. 147, 446–458 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  631. Taffet, S.M., Russell, S.W.: Macrophage-mediated tumor cell killing: Regulation of expression of cytolytic activity by prostaglandin E. J. Immunol. 126, 424–427 (1981)Google Scholar
  632. Takai, Y., Kikkawa, U., Kaibuchi, K., Nishizuka, Y.: Membrane phospholipid metabolism and signal transduction for protein phosphorylation. In: Greengard, P., Robinson, G.A., Advances in Cyclic Nucleotide and Protein Phosphorylation Research 18. Raven Press, New York, 119–158 (1984)Google Scholar
  633. Talamo, R.C.: Basic and clinical aspects of the alpha,-antitrypsin. Pediatrics 56, 91–99 (1975)Google Scholar
  634. Tamaki, K., Stingl, G., Katz, St.I.: The origin of Langerhans cells. J. Invest. Derm. 74, 309–311 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  635. Taparowsky, E., Suard, Y., Fasano, O., Shimizu, K., Goldfarb, M., Wigler, M.: Activation of the T24 bladder carcinoma transforming gene is linked to a single amino acid change. Nature 300, 762–765 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  636. Tauber, A.I.: Current views of neutrophil dysfunction, an integrated clinical perspective. Am. J. Med. 70, 1237–1246 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  637. Taylor, J.C., Crawford, LP., Hugli, T.E.: Limited degradation of the third component (C 3) of human complement by human leukocyte elastase (HLE): Partial characterization of C3-fragments. Biochemistry 16, 575–587 (1977)Google Scholar
  638. Tedesco, F., Silivani, C.M., Agelli, M., Giovanetti, A.M., Bombardieri, S.: A lupus-like syndrome in a patient with deficiency of the sixth component of complement. Arthr. Rheum. 24, 1438–1440 (1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  639. Terranova, V.P., Liotta, L.A., Vasanthakumar, G., Thorgeirsson, U., Siegal, G.P., Schiffmann, E.: Role of laminin in the adherence and chemotaxis of neutrophils. Fed. Proc. 42, 2851–2852 (1983)Google Scholar
  640. Thiel, H., Oelling, W.-P., Rasche, B.: Chronisch progredientes Lungenemphysem bei homozygotem alpha,-Antitrypsinmangel, Kasuistik einer mehr als sechsjährigen Verlaufsbeobachtung. Prax. Pneumol. 35, 23–28 (1981)Google Scholar
  641. Thomas, D.W., Shevach, E.M.: Nature of the antigenic complex recognized by T-lymphocytes, VI. The effect of anti-TNP antibody on T-cell responses to TNP-conjugated macrophages. J. Immunol. 121, 1145–1151 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  642. Thomas, J.W., Schroer, J., Danho, W., Bullesbach, E., Fohles, J., Rosenthal, A.S.: Determinant selection and macrophage-mediated Ir-Gene function. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 3–14 (1980)Google Scholar
  643. Thompson, R.E., Mandle Jr., R., Kaplan, A.P.: Characterization of human high molecular weight kininogen, Procoagulant activity associated with the light chain of kinin-free high molecular weight kininogen. J. Exp. Med. 147, 488–499 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  644. Thorne, K.J., Oliver, R.C., Lackie, J.: Changes in the surface properties of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes induced by bacteria and bacterial endotoxin. J. Cell. Sci. 27, 213–225 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  645. Till, G.: The regulation of leukocyte chemotaxis and its role in the inflammatory response. Monogr. Allergy 12, 169–178 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  646. Till, G., Ward, P.A.: Two distinct chemotactic factor inactivators in human serum. J. Immunol. 114, 843–847 (1975)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  647. Tolone, G., Bonasera, L., Brai, M., Tolone, C.: Prostaglandin production by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes during phagocytosis in vitro. Experientia 33, 839–841 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  648. Trang, L.E.: Prostaglandins and inflammation. Sem. Arthr. Rheum. 9, 153–190 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  649. Trede, M., Petermann, C., Wächter, K.: Heilungsstörungen bei aseptischen Wunden. Langenbecks Arch. Chir. 358, 161–165 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  650. Tuczek, H.V., Rabes, H.M.: Autoradiographische Untersuchungen über intralobuläre Differenzen der Flußrate von Hepatozyten in das S-Kompartiment im Frühstadium nach partieller Hepatektomie. Virchows Arch. B Cell. Path. 15, 55–63 (1973)Google Scholar
  651. Turk, D.C.: The pathogenicity of Haemophilus influenzae, occasional review. J. Med. Microbiol. 18, 1–16 (1984)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  652. Turk, J.L.: Immunologic and nonimmunologic activation of macrophages. J. Invest. Derm. 74, 301–306 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  653. Turk, J.L., Narayanan, R.B.: The monocyto-macrophage system in granulomatous inflammation. In: Schmalz’, F., Huhn, D., Schaefer, H.E., Haematology and Blood Transfusion 27, Disorders of the Monocyt Macrophage System. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 99–105 (1981)Google Scholar
  654. Turner, S.R., Lynn, W.S.: Lipid molecules as chemotactic factors. In: Gallin, J.I., Quie, P.G., Leukocyte Chemotaxis. Raven Press, New York, 289–298 (1978)Google Scholar
  655. Tyers, M.B., Haywood, H.: Effects of prostaglandins on peripheral nociceptors in acute inflammation. Agents Actions Suppl. 6, 65–77 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  656. Ulmer, W.T., Zimmermann, I., Bugalho de Almeida, A.A., Park, H.S.: Effects of exogenous and endogenous histamine on the respiratory system. Klin. Wochenschr. 60, 991–996 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  657. Unanue, E.R.: The regulation of lymphocyte functions by the macrophage. Immunological Reviews 40, 235–249 (1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  658. Unanue, E.R.: T cell-macrophage interaction in infection to the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 73–85 (1980)Google Scholar
  659. Unanue, E.R.: The regulatory role of macrophages in antigenic stimulation, Part two: Symbiotic relationship between lymphocytes and macrophages. Adv. Immunol. 31, 1–136 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  660. Uotila, L., Suttle, J.W.: Recent findings in understanding the biological function of vitamin K. Medical Biology 60, 16–24 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  661. Urbaschek, B., Urbaschek, R.: The inflammatory response to endotoxins. Bibliotheca anatomica 17, 74–104 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  662. Vaes, G., Huybrechts-Codin, G., Hauser, P.: Lymphocyte-macrophage-fibroblast-cooperation in the inflammatory degradation of cartilage and connective tissue. Agents Actions 7, 100–108 (1980)Google Scholar
  663. Valone, F.H.: Regulation of human leukocyte function by lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid. In: Snyderman, R., Contemporary Topics in Immunology 14, Regulation of Leukocyte Function. Plenum Press, New York, London, 155–170 (1984)Google Scholar
  664. van Dyke, T.E., Bartholomew, E., Genco, R.J., Slots, J., Levine, M.J.: Inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by soluble bacterial products. J. Periodontol. 53, 502–508 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  665. van Epps, D.E., Palmer, D.L., Williams, R.C.: Characterization of serum inhibitors of neutrophil chemotaxis associated with anergy. J. Immunol. 113, 189–200 (1974)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  666. van Furth, R.: Cell kinetics during inflammation. Agents Actions Suppl. 4, 51–59 (1977)Google Scholar
  667. van Furth, R.: The mononuclear phagocyte system. Verh. Dtsch. Ges. Path. 64, 1–10 (1980)Google Scholar
  668. van Furth, R., Crofton, R.W.: The origin and kinetics of liver macrophages during steady state and inflammation. In: Willoughby, D.A., Perspectives in Inflammation. MTP Press, Lancaster, Engl., 81–83 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  669. van Furth, R., Willemze, R.: Phagocytic cells during an acute inflammatory reaction. In: Movat, H.Z., Current Topics in Pathology 68, Inflammatory Reaction. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 179–212 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  670. van Furth, R., Diesselhoff-den Dulk, M., Mattie, H.: Quantitative study on the production and kinetics of mononuclear phagocytes during an acute inflammatory response. J. Exp. Med. 138, 1314–1330 (1973)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  671. van Furth, R., Raeburn, J.A., van Zwet, T.L.: Characteristics of human mononuclear phagocytes. Blood 54, 485–500 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  672. van Furth, R., Diesselhoff-den Dulk, Martina, M.C., Raeburn, J.A., van Zwet, T.L., Crofton, R., Blussé van Oud Alblas, A.: Characteristics, origin and kinetics of human and murine mononuclear phagocytes. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 279–298 (1980)Google Scholar
  673. van Heyningen, S.: Bacterial toxins and cyclic AMP. Nature 299, 782 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  674. Vanhoutte, P.M.: Introductery remarks: Why 5-hydroxytryptamine. Fed. Proc. 42, 211–212 (1983a)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  675. Vanhoutte, P.M.: 5-Hydroxytryptamine and vascular disease. Fed. Proc. 42, 233–237 (1983b)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  676. van Nueten, J.M.: 5-Hydroxytryptamine and precapillary vessels. Fed. Proc. 42, 223–227 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  677. van Waarde, D., Hulsing-Hesselink, E., Sandkuyl, L.A., van Furth, R.: Humoral regulation of monocytopoiesis during the early phase of an inflammatory reaction caused by particulate substances. Blood 50, 141–154 (1977a)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  678. van Waarde, D., Hulsing-Hesselink, E., van Furth, R.: Properties of a factor increasing monocytopoiesis (FIM) occurring in serum during the early phase of an inflammatory reaction. Blood 50, 727–742 (1977b)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  679. van Waarde, D., Hulsing-Hesselink, E., van Furth, R.: Humoral control of monocytopoiesis by an activator and an inhibitor. Agents Actions 84, 432–437 (1978)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  680. Vassalli, J.D., Reich, E.: Macrophage plasminogenactivator: Induction by products of activated lymphoid cells. J. Exp. Med. 154, 429–437 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  681. Venge, P.: Polymorphonuclear leukocyte proteases and their effects on complement components and neutrophil function. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 264–275 (1978)Google Scholar
  682. Verweij-van Vught, A.M.J.J., van den Bosch, J.F., Namavar, F., Sparrius, M., Mac Laren, D.M.: K Antigens of Escherichia coli and virulence in urinary-tract infection: Studies in mouse model. J. Med. Microbiol. 16, 147–155 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  683. Verweij-van Vught, A.M.J.J., Namavar, F., Peerbooms, H., Sparrius, M., Mac Laren, D.M.: The role of different K antigens of Escherichia coli in phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J. Med. Microbiol. 17, 141–150 (1984)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  684. Vickers, M.R., Milliner, K., Martin, D., Ganelli, C.R.: Histamine-induced inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and lysosomal enzyme release from polymorphs may not be mediated via H,- or Hz-receptors. Agents Actions 12, 630–634 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  685. Vinegar, R., Truax, J.F., Selph, J.L., Voelker, F.A.: Pathway of onset, development, and decay of carrageenan pleurisy in the rat. Fed. Proc. 41, 2588–2595 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  686. Vranian, G., Conrad, D.H., Ruddy, S.: Specificity of C3 receptors that mediated phagocytosis by rat peritoneal mastcells. J. Immunol. 126, 2302–2306 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  687. Wahn, V.: Hereditäre Komplementdefekte. Monatsschr. Kinderheilkd. 131, 765–772 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  688. Waldvogel, F.A.: Pathophysiological mechanisms in pyogenic infections: Two examples — Pleural empyema and acute bacterial meningitis. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufman, N., Current Topics in Imflammation and Infection. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore/London, 115–122 (1982)Google Scholar
  689. Walker, R.I., Willemze, R.: Neutrophil kinetics and the regulation of granulopoiesis. Rev. Infect. Dis. 2, 282–292 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  690. Walker, W.S.: Macrophage heterogeneity: Membrane markers and properties of macrophage subpopulations. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 307–318 (1980)Google Scholar
  691. Wall, R.T., Harker, L.A., Quadracci, L.J., Striker, G.E.: Factors influencing endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. J. Cell. Physiol. 96, 203–214 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  692. Walsh, P.N.: Platelets and coagulation proteins. Fed. Proc. 40, 2086–2091 (1981)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  693. Ward, P.A.: Mediators of inflammatory responses. In: Cohen, S., Ward, P.A., Mc Cluskey, R.T., Mechanisms in Immunpathology. Wiley & Sons, New York, 1–12 (1979)Google Scholar
  694. Ward, P.A.: Inflammatory proteins: Chemical and biological aspects. Clin. Biochem. 13, 187–190 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  695. Ward, P.A.: The Chemotaxis system. In: Majno, G., Cotran, R.S., Kaufman, N., Current Topics in Inflammation and Infection. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore/London, 54–61 (1982)Google Scholar
  696. Ward, P.A., Berenberg, J.L.: Defective regulation of inflammatory mediators in Hodgkin’s disease, supernormal levels of chemotactic-factor inactivator. N. Engl. J. Med. 290, 76–80 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  697. Ward, P.A., Goralnick, S., Bullock, W.E.: Defective leukotaxis in patients with lepromatous leprosy. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 87, 1025–1032 (1976)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  698. Ward, P.A., Kreutzer, D.L., Senior, R.M.: The modulation of leukotaxis by neutral proteases and other factors from neutrophils. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg. Baltimore, München, 276–286 (1978)Google Scholar
  699. Ward, P.A., Hugli, T.E., Chenoweth, D.E.: Complement and chemotaxis. In: Glynn, L.E., Houck, J.C., Weissmann, G., Handbook of Inflammation I, Chemical Messengers of the Inflammatory Process. Elsevier/North Holland, Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, New York, Oxford, 153–178 (1979)Google Scholar
  700. Ward, P.E., Sheridan, M.S.: Converting enzyme kininase and angiotensinase of renal and intestinal brush border. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156B, 835–844 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  701. Wasi, S., Movat, H.Z., Pass, E., Chan, J.Y.C.: Production, conversion and destruction of kinins by human neutrophil leukocyte proteases. In: Havemann, K., Janoff, A., Neutral Proteases of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes. Urban & Schwarzenberg, Baltimore, München, 245–260 (1978)Google Scholar
  702. Watson, J.D., Mochizuki, D.Y., Gillis, S.: Molecular characterization of interleukin 2. Fed. Proc. 42, 2747–2752 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  703. Weigelt, H., Addicks, K., Houck, G., Lubbers, D.W.: Vital microscopic studies in regard to the role of endothelian reactive structures in the inflammatory process. Bibliotheca Anatomica 17, 11–20 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  704. Weigle, W.O., Morgan, E.L., Goodman, M.G., Chenoweth, D.E., Hugli, T.E.: Modulation of the immune response by anaphylatoxin in the microenvironment of the interacting cells. Fed. Proc. 41, 3099–3103 (1982)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  705. Weir, D.M., Ogmundsdóttir, H.M.: Cellular recognition by phagocytes: Role of lectin-like receptor(s). In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 865–884 (1980)Google Scholar
  706. Weiss, J., Elsbach, P., Olsson, I., Odeberg, H.: Purification and characterization of a potent bactericidal and membrane active protein from the granules of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. J. Biol. Chem. 253, 2664–2672 (1978)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  707. Weisbart, R.H., Bluestone, R., Goldberg, L.S., Pearson, C.M.: Migration enhancement factor: A new lymphokine. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 875–879 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  708. Weissmann, G., Goldstein, I., Hoffstein, S., Tsung, P.K.: Reciprocal effects of cAMP and cGMP on microtubule-dependent release of lysosomal enzymes. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 253, 750–762 (1975)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  709. Weissmann, G., Korchak, H.M., Perez, H.D., Smolen, J.E., Goldstein, I.M., Hoffstein, S.T.: Leukocytes as secretory organs of inflammation. In: Weissmann, G., Samuelsson, B., Paoletti, R., Advances in Inflammation Research I. Raven Press, New York, 95–112 (1979)Google Scholar
  710. Weissmann, G., Smolen, J.E., Korchak, H.M.: Release of inflammatory mediators from stimulated neutrophils. N. Engl. J. Med. 303, 27–34 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  711. Weissmann, G., Serhan, C., Korchak, H.M., Smolen, J.E.: Neutrophils: Release of mediators of inflammation with special reference to rheumatoid arthritis. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 389, 11–24 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  712. Weksler, B.B., Goldstein, I.M.: Prostaglandins: Interaction with platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in hemostasis and inflammation. Am. J. Med. 68, 419–428 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  713. Weller, P.F., Goetzl, E.J.: The human eosinophil. Roles in host defense and tissue injury. Am. J. Pathol. 100, 793–820 (1980)Google Scholar
  714. Werb, Z., Bauda, M.J., Jones, P.A.: Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages, I. Proteolysis of elastin, glycoproteins, and collagen by proteinases isolated from macrophages. J. Exp. Med. 152, 1340–1357 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  715. Werdelin, O.: Antigen-specific physical interaction between macrophages and T-lymphocytes. In: Unanue, E.R., Rosenthal, A.S., Macrophage Regulation of Immunity. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 213–229 (1980)Google Scholar
  716. Westwick, J.: Prostaglandins as mediators of inflammation — Vascular aspects. Agents Actions Suppl. 6, 59–62 (1979)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  717. Wexler, D.A., Nelson, R.D., Cleary, P.P.: Human neutrophil chemotactic response to group A streptococci: Bacteria-mediated interference with complement-derived chemotactic factors. Infect. Immun. 39, 239–246 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  718. Whaley, K.: Biosynthesis of the complement components and the regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway by human peripheral blood monocytes. J. Exp. Med. 151, 501–516 (1980)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  719. Whitelaw, D.M., Batho, H.F.: Kinetics of monocytes. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes in Immunity, Infection and Pathology. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, London, Edinburgh, Melbourne, 175–188 (1975)Google Scholar
  720. Wicklmayr, M., Brunnbauer, H., Dietze, G.: The kallikrein-kinin-prostaglandin system: Involvement in the control of capillary blood flow and substrate metabolism in skeletal muscle. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 156A, 625–638 (1983)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  721. Wilkinson, P.C.: Synthetic peptide chemotactic factors for neutrophile: The range of active peptides, their efficacy and inhibitory activity and susceptibility of the cellular response to enzymes and bacterial toxins. Immunol. 36, 579–588 (1979)Google Scholar
  722. Wilkinson, P.C., Allan, R.B.: The locomotor behaviour of human blood monocytes in chemotactic and chemokinetic environments and the role of substratum in monocyte locomotion. In: van Furth, R., Mononuclear Phagocytes, Functional Aspects I. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, The Hague-Boston-London, 475–500 (1980)Google Scholar
  723. Wilkinson, P.C., Lackie, J.M.: The adhesion, migration and chemotaxis of leukocytes in inflammation. In: Movat, H.Z., Current Topics in Pathology 68, Inflammatory Reaction. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 47–88 (1979)Google Scholar
  724. Williams, L.T., Snyderman, R., Pike, M.C., Lefkowitz, R.J.: Specific receptors sites for chemotactic peptides in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 1204–1208 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  725. Williams, T.J., José, P.J.: Mediation of increased vascular permeability after complement activation. J. Exp. Med. 153, 136–153 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  726. Williams, T.J., Peck, M.J.: Role of prostaglandin-mediated vasodilation in inflammation. Nature 270, 530–532 (1977)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  727. Wilson, A.B., Prichard-Thomas, S., Gurner, B.-W., Lachmann, P.J., Coombs, R.R.A.: Complement component on human lymphocytes. Clin. Immunol. Immunpathol. 22, 118–127 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  728. Wilson Cox, D., Smyth, S.: Risk for liver disease in adults with alpha,-antitrypsin deficiency. Am. J. Med. 74, 221–227 (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  729. Wong, P.Y., Talamo, R.C., Williams, G.H.: Kallikrein-kinin and renin-angiotensin systems in functional renal failure of cirrhosis of the liver. Gastroenterology 73, 1114–1118 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  730. Woodward, D.F., Owen, D.A.A.: The time course of the vascular events associated with inflammation due to ultraviolet irradiation of guinea pig ears. In: Willoughby, D.A., Perspectives in Inflammation. MTP-Press, Lancaster England, 289–293 (1977)Google Scholar
  731. Woodward, D.F., Owen, D.A.: Studies on histamine-induced cutaneous flare in the guinea pig. Agents Actions 13, 35–44 (1983)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  732. Wright, D.G., Gallin, J.I.: A functional differentiation of human neutrophil granules: Generation of C 5a by a specific (secondary) granule product and inactivation of C5a by azurophil (primary) granule products. J. Immunol. 119, 1068–1076 (1977)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  733. Zabucchi, G., Bellavite, P., Berton, G., Dri, P.: Free radicals generation by the inflammatory cells. Agents Actions 7, 159–166 (1980)Google Scholar
  734. Zederfeldt, B.: Factors influencing wound healing. In: Viidik Vunst, Biology of Collagen. Academic Press, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, San Francisco, 347–362 (1980)Google Scholar
  735. Zeitlin, I.J., Sharma, J.N., Brooks, P.M., Dick, W.C.: Raised plasma kininogen levels in rheumatoid patients — Response to therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. 70, 335–343 (1976)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  736. Zigmond, S.H.: Chemotaxis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes — Review. J. Cell. Biol. 77, 269–287 (1978)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  737. Zigmond, S.H.: Consequences of chemotactic peptide receptor modulation for leukocyte orientation. J. Cell. Biol. 88, 644–647 (1981)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  738. Zigmond, S.H., Hirsch, J.G.: Leukocyte locomotion and chemotaxis, new methods for evaluation, and demonstration of a cell-derived chemotactic factor. J. Exp. Med. 137, 387–410 (1973)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  739. Zimmer, B., Hartung, H.-P., Scharfenberg, G., Bitter-Suermann, D., Hadding, U.: Quantitative studies of the secretion of complement component C3 by resident, elicited and activated macrophages. Comparison with C2, C4and lysosomal enzyme release. Eur. Immunol. 12, 426–430 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  740. Zurier, R.B.: Prostaglandins immune responses and murine lupus. Arthr. Rheum. 25, 804–809 (1982)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  741. Zurier, R.B., Weissmann, G., Hoffstein, S., Kammermann, S., Tai, H.H.: Mechanisms of lysosomal enzyme release of lysosomal from human leukocytes: II. Effects of cAMP and cGMP, autonomic and agents with affect microtubule function. J. Clin. Invest. 53, 297–309 (1974)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  742. Zwaan, F.E.: Haemopoietic progenitor cells in peripheral blood. Blut 45, 87–95 (1982)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  743. Zweifach, B.W.: Microcirculatory aspects of tissue injury. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 116, 831–838 (1964)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burkhard Helpap
    • 1
  1. 1.Pathologisches InstitutStädtisches Krankenhaus SingenSingenBundesrepublik Deutschland

Personalised recommendations