Homologous Radioimmunoassay for Human Parathyroid Hormone (Residues 1–34) with Biotinylated Peptide as Tracer

  • A. Stadler

Abstract

Along with calcitonin and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 the polypeptide parathyroid hormone (parathyrin) (PTH) is responsible for maintaining calcium and phosphorus homeostasis in vertebrates. Parathyrin is a polypeptide of 84 amino acids and produced by the parathyroid glands [1]. A change of 0.2 g/dl in the blood calcium concentration alters the secretory state of the parathyoid glands [2]. The cleavage of intact PTH into the amino-terminal, midregional, and carboxy-terminal fragments takes place in the liver and kidneys [3–5]. Besides the intact PTH only the amino-terminal part shows bioactivity. All other fragments are biologically inert [6]. PTH(1–34) interacts directly with bone and kidneys and—indirectly—with the intestine. This interaction increases the calcium level in human serum [1, 7, 8]. The diseases primary hyperparathyroi-dism (pHPT), secondary HPT, and hypoparathyroidism are closely connected with the PTH secretion of the parathyroid glands [8]. Detection of the PTH levels by radioimmunological procedures can provide the diagnosis for these diseases. Several homologous radioimmunoassays (RIAs) have been developed for the detection of the different PTH fragments [9–13]. To study the chronic secretory state of the parathyroid glands and to diagnose primary hyper-parathyroidism the homologous RIA for the carboxy-terminal PTH is useful [13]. Human parathyrin hPTH (53–84) has a half-life of 1–2h [14]. It is possible to estimate the function of a transplanted kidney by measuring midregion PTH.

Keywords

Phosphorus Polyethylene Glycol Polypeptide Biotin 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

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  • A. Stadler

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