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Teaching English as a Third Language in Primary and Secondary School: The Potential of Pluralistic Approaches to Language Learning

  • Romana KopečkováEmail author
  • Gregory J. Poarch
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Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to present the aims, rationale, and practical teaching examples of a DaZ seminar offered at the Department of English, University of Münster. Building on the latest findings from research on cognitive and acquisitional aspects of third language acquisition, the seminar encourages future primary and secondary school teachers of English as a foreign language to become aware that a growing number of their future pupils will have a heritage/migrant language background and will thus be learning English as a third language. Furthermore, reflecting on the role of metalinguistic and cross-linguistic awareness in the development and maintenance of individual multilingualism is facilitated. Throughout the term, the students evaluate and experiment with designing language learning activities that foster multilingual competence of young English learners, while following the Framework of Reference for Pluralistic Approaches to Languages and Cultures (FREPA, Candelier et al. 2012). Offering both a theoretical grounding for and a practical experience of how to foster and cultivate pupils’ willingness to observe, explore, manipulate, and enjoy languages, the seminar hopes to empower future teachers to view diversity not as a detriment to but rather as a catalyst for new language learning.

Keywords

English as L3 Multilingualism Third language acquisition Metalinguistic awareness Cross-linguistic awareness Pluralistic teaching approaches FREPA 

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Recommended reading

  1. Aronin, L., & Singleton, D. (2012). Multilingualism. Amsterdam: Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.WWU MünsterMuensterGermany

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