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Self-determined Learning (Heutagogy) and Digital Media Creating integrated Educational Environments for Developing Lifelong Learning Skills

  • Lisa Marie Blaschke
Chapter

Abstract

Defined as the study of self-determined learning, heutagogy is a learner-centered educational theory founded on the key principles of learner agency, self-efficacy, capability, and metacognition (knowing how to learn) and reflection. Combined with today’s technologies, the theory provides a framework for designing and developing learner-centered environments that have the potential to equip learners with the necessary skills for a lifetime of learning. In addition, application of heutagogy has been to shown to promote themes of both social responsibility and justice, as well as a more democratic educational process. This chapter outlines the fundamental principles of heutagogy, or self-determined learning, and describes ways in which the theory can be applied, taking into consideration the critical and changing roles played by the student, teacher, and institution in creating a holistic, self-determined learning environment. In addition, the chapter also identifies technologies – in particular social media – that can be used to support development of self-determined learning.

Keywords

Heutagogy Self-determined learning Social media Lifelong learning Self-directed learning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.C3L – Center für lebenslanges LernenCarl von Ossietzky Universität OldenburgOldenburgGermany

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