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Introduction

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Abstract

This volume attempts to explore and combine two fresh perspectives on the relation of science and politics: From the perspective of philosophy, history, and sociology of science, it seems worth investigating how scientific and other knowledge communities interact with their wider social and political surroundings, both in a national and an international context. From the perspective of political science, it appears fruitful to ask how existing inter- or transnational communities contribute to the strengthening of transnational ties, and to facilitate political cooperation and integration. Bringing together these two perspectives, we ask: How are knowledge communities in science and other fields formed, how do they function, and how do they interact with their wider environment?

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© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of DundeeDundeeScotland
  2. 2.Philosophisches SeminarUniversität SiegenSiegenGermany

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