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Can Advertisers Benefit from the Name-Letter- and Birthday-Number Effect?

Chapter
Part of the European Advertising Academy book series (EAA)

Abstract

Definitions: Envision, your first name is Anne and you intend to order Pizza. There are two restaurants to do this service: Alfredo and Luigi. Would your choice be affected by the congruence of the initial letter of your first name and Alfredo? If you respond favorably to this commonality, your behavior is affected by the name-letter effect (Nuttin, 1985; Coulter and Grewal, 2014).

Keywords

Test Stimulus Match Condition Test Person Initial Letter Test Participant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MarketingUniversität AugsburgAugsburgGermany

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