Values in Practice: Change and Continuity in Luangan Ritual Performance

Chapter
Part of the Edition Centaurus - Sozioökonomische Prozesse in Asien, Afrika und Lateinamerika book series (SPAA)

Abstract

In this article I explore cultural values, in the sense of conceptions of “the good and desirable” (Robbins 2012; 2013), as conveyed through ritual performances among the Luangan Dayak in the border area between the provinces of East and Central Kalimantan. This is an area which has undergone extensive environmental, economic, and social change in recent years, occasioning a shift in value orientations.

Keywords

Sugar Europe Income Fishing Arena 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Akin, D. (1999). Cash and Shell Money in Kwaio, Solomon Islands. In D. Akin & J. Robbins (Eds.), Money and Modernity: State and Local Currencies in Melanesia, pp. 103-130. Pittsburg: Pittsburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Atkinson, J. (1987). Religions in Dialogue: The Construction of an Indonesian Minority Religion. In R. S. Kipp & S. Rodgers (Eds.), Indonesian Religions in Transition, pp. 171-186. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
  3. Atkinson, J. (1989). The Art and Politics of Wana Shamanship. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bird-David, N. (1999). “Animism” Revisited: Personhood, Environment, and Relational Epistemology. Current Anthropology 40, pp. S67-S91.Google Scholar
  5. Bird-David, N. (2004). Illness-images and Joined Beings: A Critical/ Nayaka Perspective on Intercorporality. Social Anthropology 12(3), pp. 325-339.Google Scholar
  6. Bloch, M. & J. Parry. (1989). Introduction: Money and the Materiality of Exchange. In J. Parry & M. Bloch (Eds.), Money and the Morality of Exchange, pp.1-32. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Brenner, R. (1985). Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe. In T.H. Alston & C.H.E. Philpin (Eds.), The Brenner Debate: Agrarian Class Structure and Economic Development in Pre-Industrial Europe, pp. 10-63. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Davidson, J. S. & Henley, D. (2007). The Revival of Tradition in Indonesian Politics: The Deployment of Adat from Colonialism to Indigenism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Donzelli, A. (2007). Copyright and Authorship: Ritual Speech and the New Market of Words in Toraja. In D. Berliner & R. Sarró (Eds.), Learning Religion: Anthropological Approaches, pp. 141-160. New York: Berghahn Books.Google Scholar
  10. Eliade, M. (1964). Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy. Translated by W. R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Graeber, D. (2001). Toward an Anthropological Theory of Value: The False Coin of Our Dreams. New York: Palgrave.Google Scholar
  12. Harrington, M. H. (2014). Changing Exchanges: A Modern Siang Village amidst Resource Extraction in Regional Indonesia. Ph.D. diss. Asia Institute.Google Scholar
  13. Haug, M. (2010). Poverty and Decentralisation in East Kalimantan: The Impact of Regional Autonomy on Dayak Benuaq Wellbeing. Freiburg: Centaurus Verlag.Google Scholar
  14. Herrmans, I. (2015). Ritual Retellings: Luangan Healing Performances through Practice. New York: Berghahn Books.Google Scholar
  15. Ingold, T. (2006). Rethinking the Animate, Re-animating Thought. Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology, 71(1), pp. 9-20.Google Scholar
  16. Keeler, W. (2001). Javanese: A Cultural Approach. Athens: Ohio University for International Studies.Google Scholar
  17. Lambek, M. (2012). Religion and Morality. In D. Fassin (Ed.), A Companion to Moral Anthropology, pp. 341-358. Malden: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  18. Lambek, M. (2013). The Value of (Performative) Acts. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 3(2), pp. 141-60.Google Scholar
  19. Li, T. M. (2014). Land’s End: Capitalist Relations on an Indigenous Frontier. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Picard, M. (2011). Introduction: “Agama”, “Adat”, and Pancasila. In M. Picard & R. Madinier (Eds.), The Politics of Religion in Indonesia: Syncretism, Orthodoxy, and Religious Contention in Java and Bali, pp. 1-20. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  21. Rappaport, R. (1999). Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Reuter, T. (2009). Globalisation and Local Identities: The Rise of New Ethnic and Religious Movements in Post-Suharto Indonesia. Asian Journal of Social Science 37, pp. 857–871.Google Scholar
  23. Reuter, T. (2013). An Ancient Temple and a New King: Revitalization, Ritual and Politics in the Highlands of Bali. In T. Reuter & A. Horstmann (Eds.), Faith in the Future: Understanding the Revitalization of Religions and Cultural Traditions in Asia, pp. 15-37. Leiden: Brill.Google Scholar
  24. Robbins, J. & D. Akin. (1999). An Introduction to Melanesian Currencies: Agency, Identity, and Social Reproduction. In D. Akin & J. Robbins (Eds.), Money and Modernity: State and Local Currencies in Melanesia, pp. 103-130. Pittsburg: Pittsburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Robbins, J. (2012). Cultural Values. In D. Fassin (Ed.), A Companion to Moral Anthropology, pp. 117-132. Malden: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
  26. Robbins, J. (2013). Monism, Pluralism, and the Structure of Value Relations: A Dumontian Contribution to the Contemporary Study of Value. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 3(1), pp. 99-115.Google Scholar
  27. Rousseau, J. (2013). When Sudden Economic Change is not Traumatic: The Collapse of Meat Sharing in Central Borneo. Social Evolution & History 12(1), pp. 78–87.Google Scholar
  28. Sather, C. (2001). Seeds of Play, Words of Power: An Ethnographic Study of Iban Shamanic Chants. Kuala Lumpur: The Tun Jugah Foundation.Google Scholar
  29. Schiller, A. (1997). Small Sacrifices: Religious Change and Cultural Identity among the Ngaju of Indonesia. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Sillander, K. (2004). Acting Authoritatively: How Authority is Expressed Through Social Action among the Bentian of Indonesian Borneo. Helsinki: Helsinki University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Sillander, K. (2011). Kinship and the Dialectics of Autonomy and Solidarity among the Bentian of Borneo. In T. Gibson & K. Sillander (Eds.), Anarchic Solidarity: Autonomy, Equality, and Fellowship in Southeast Asia, pp. 141-169. New Haven: Yale University Southeast Asia Studies.Google Scholar
  32. Sutton, R. (1996). Interpreting Electronic Sound Technology in the Contemporary Javanese Soundscape. Ethnomusicology, 40(2), pp. 249-268.Google Scholar
  33. Strathern, M. (1988). The Gender of the Gift: Problems with Women and Problems with Society in Melanesia. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  34. Weinstock, J. (1983). Kaharingan and the Luangan Dayaks: Religion and Identity in Central-East Borneo. Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell University.Google Scholar
  35. Wood, E. M. (2002). The Origins of Capitalism: A Longer View. London: Verso.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Swedish School of Social ScienceUniversity of HelsinkiUniversity of HelsinkiFinnland

Personalised recommendations