Cultural Morphology and the Comparative Study of Cultures in the Shaping of Political Communities

Wealth Objects and Royal Gift-Giving in the Neo-Assyrian and Inca Empires
Chapter
Part of the Universal- und kulturhistorische Studien. Studies in Universal and Cultural History book series (UUKS)

Zusammenfassung

In a paper published some fifteen years ago, Egyptologist John Baines and Assyriologist Norman Yoffee identified an interconnected group of elements that distinguish civilizations from states and other complex social forms. By comparing two early civilizations that arose at about the same time and in close geographical proximity, they sought to develop a comparative method for investigating the evolution of ancient states and civilizations After reviewing and contrasting governmental institutions, urbanization, writing systems, and economies, they proposed that the similar features between the two civilizations lay, in fact, “in the nature of order, legitimacy, and wealth and the interrelations among these,” a set of interrelations they termed “high culture”.

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© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Arts HistoryNorthwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA

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