Classical and Contemporary Islamic Perspectives on Religious Plurality

Chapter
Part of the Wiener Beiträge zur Islamforschung book series (WSI)

Abstract

This chapter takes a conceptual approach to the topic, providing an overview of Islamic resources for theologies of religious diversity while surveying some major and representative Muslim approaches to the existence of religious diversity, both classical and contemporary.

Keywords

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Loyola University ChicagoChicagoUSA

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