Advertisement

Introduction

  • Diedrich Bruns
  • Olaf Kühne
  • Antje Schönwald
  • Simone Theile
Part of the RaumFragen: Stadt – Region – Landschaft book series (RFSRL)

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of the emerging field of study within the topic of multicultural landscape, the content of the book and the research perspectives.

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the results of the conference "Landscapes: Theory, Practice and International Context" , held in Otzenhausen, Germany in February 2012. This was a precursor to the Kassel Conference of 2013. One aim of the Otzenhausen Conference was to reflect on current landscape concepts, and also to explore relationships that exist between landscape theory and practice.

Keywords

International Context Visitor Flow Place Attachment Landscape Planning Outdoor Recreation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arends-Tóth J, van de Vijver F J R (2007): Acculturation attitudes: a comparison of measurement methods. In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology 37 (7), 1462–1488.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bruns D, Kühne O (eds)(2013). Landschaften. Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Schwerin: Oceano-Verlag.Google Scholar
  3. Buijs A E (2009): Public Natures: Social Representations of Nature and Local Practices. Wageningen.Google Scholar
  4. Buijs A E, Elands B H M, Langers F (2009). No wilderness for immigrants: Cultural differences in images of nature and landscape preferences. Landscape and Urban Planning 91 (2009) 113–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Buijs A E, Elands B H M, Langers F (2009): No Wilderness for Immigrants: Cultural Differences in Images of Nature and Landscape Preferences. In: Landscape and Urban Planning 91 (3), 113–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Costa A, Foucart A, Hayakawa S, Aparici M, Apesteguia J, et al. (2014): Your Morals Depend on Language. PLoS ONE 9(4): e94842.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Deng J, Walker G J, Swinnerton G (2005): Leisure attitudes: A comparison between Chinese in Canada and Anglo‐Canadians. Leisure/Loisir. Volume 29, Issue 2, 239–273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Dömek C, Güleş O, Piniek S, Prey G (2006): Urban nature – Perception, Evaluation and Adoption by Turkish migrants in the northern Ruhr Area under special Consideration of Urban-Industrial Woodlands. In: Hohn U, Keil A (eds): Kurzbericht zum Projekt Stadtnatur – Wahrnehmung, Bewertung und Aneignung durch türkische MigrantInnen im nördlichen Ruhrgebiet unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von Industriewaldflächen. Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Land Nordrhein-Westfalen.Google Scholar
  9. Drexler D (2013): Landscape, Paysage, Landschaft, Táj: The Cultural Background of Landscape Perceptions in England, France, Germany, and Hungary. Journal of Ecological Anthropology 16(1): 85–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Elands B, Buijs A (2010): Public support for the protection of nature and landscape explained by ethnicity and images of nature. In: Goossen M, Elands B, van Marwijk R (eds): Recreation, tourism and nature in a changing world. The Fifth International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas. Wageningen, 39–40.Google Scholar
  11. Floyd M F, Bocarro J, Thompson T D (2008): Research on race and ethnicity in leisure studies: A review of five major journals. Journal of Leisure Research, 40, 1–22.Google Scholar
  12. Gehring K, Kohsaka R (2007): ‘Landscape’ in the Japanese Language: Conceptual Differences and Implications for Landscape Research. In: Landscape Research 32 (2), 273–283.Google Scholar
  13. Gentin S (2010): Adolescents‘ outdoor recreation – a comparative study. In: Goossen M, Elands B, van Marwijk R (eds): Recreation, tourism and nature in a changing world. The Fifth International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas. Wageningen, 41–42.Google Scholar
  14. Gobster H (2002): Managing Urban Parks for a Racially and Ethnically Diverse Clientele. In: Leisure Sciences 24 (2), 143–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gómez E (2006): The ethnicity and public recreation participation (EPRP) model: an assessment of unidimensionality and overall fit. Leisure Sciences, 28 (2): 245–266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Goossen M, Elands B, van Marwijk R (eds) (2010): Recreation, tourism and nature in a changing world. The Fifth International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitor Flows in Recreational and Protected Areas. Wageningen. http://mmv.boku.ac.at/downloads/mmv5-proceedings.pdf (22.04.2013).
  17. Johnson C Y, Bowker J M, Bergstrom J C, Cordell H K (2004): Wilderness Values in America: Does Immigrant Status or Ethnicity Matter? Society and Natural Resources, 17: 611–628.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Johnson C Y, Bowker J M, Bergstrom J C, Cordell H K (2004): Wilderness values in America: does immigrant status or ethnicity matter? In: Society and Natural Resources 17 (7), 611–628.Google Scholar
  19. Jorgensen B S, Stedman R C (2006): A comparative analysis of predictors of sense of place dimensions: attachment to, dependency on, and identification with lakeshore properties. In: Journal of Environmental Management 79 (3), 316–327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Keefe S F, Padilla A M (1987): Chicano Ethnicity. Albuquerque.Google Scholar
  21. Kloek M E, Buijs A E, Boersema J J, Schouten M G C (2013) Crossing borders: review of concepts and approaches in research on greenspace, immigration and society in northwest European countries. Landscape Research 38 (1): 117–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Kloek M E, Buijs A E, Boersema J J, Schouten M G C (2015): Crossing borders: review of concepts and approaches in research on greenspace, immigration and society in northwest European countries. In: Landscape Research 38 (1), 117–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Küchler J, Wang, X (2009): Vielfältig und vieldeutig. Natur und Landschaft im Chinesischen. In: Kirchhoff, T.; Trepl, L. (Hrsg.): Vieldeutige Natur. Landschaft, Wildnis, Ökosystem als kulturgeschichtliche Phänomene. Bielefeld, 201–220.Google Scholar
  24. Kühne O (2013): Landschaftstheorie und Landschaftspraxis. Eine Einführung aus sozialkonstruktivistischer Perspektive. Wiesbaden.Google Scholar
  25. Loukaitou-Sideris A (1995): Urban Form and Social Context: Cultural Differentiation in the Uses of Urban Parks. In: Journal of Planning Education and Research 14 (2), 89–102.Google Scholar
  26. Makhzoumi J (2002): Landscape in the Middle East: An inquiry. In: Landscape Research 27 (3), 213–228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Marjolein E, Kloek A, Buijs E, Boersema J J, Matthijs G, Schouten C (2012): Crossing Borders: Review of Concepts and Approaches in Research on Greenspace, Immigration and Society in Northwest European Countries. In: Landscape Research 38 (1), 117–140.Google Scholar
  28. Martin C D, Thierry G, Kuipers J R, Boutonnet B, Foucart A, Costa A (2013): Bilinguals reading in their second language do not predict upcoming words as native readers do. Journal of Memory and Language. 69, 571–588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Müller C (2009): Zur Bedeutung von Interkulturellen Gärten für eine nachhaltige Stadtentwicklung. In: Gstach D, Hubenthal H, Spitthöver M (eds): Gärten als Alltagskultur im internationalen Vergleich. Garden as everyday culture – an international comparison. Arbeitsberichte des Fachbereichs Architektur, Stadtplanung, Landschaftsplanung, Heft 169: 119–134.Google Scholar
  30. Newell P B (1997): A cross-cultural examination of favourite places. Environment and Behavior, 29(4), 495–514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Olwig K R (2002): Landscape, Nature, and the Body Politic. From Britain’s Renaissance to America’s New World. London.Google Scholar
  32. Özgüner H (2011): Cultural Differences in Attitudes towards Urban Parks and Green Spaces. In: Landscape Research 36 (5) 599–620.Google Scholar
  33. Peters K, Elands B, Buijs A (2010): Social interactions in urban parks: Stimulating social cohesion? In: Urban Forestry and Urban Greening 9 (2), 93–100.Google Scholar
  34. Rishbeth C (2001): Ethnic Minority Groups and the Design of Public Open Space: an inclusive landscape? In: Landscape Research 26 (4), 351–366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Rishbeth C (2004): Ethno-cultural Representation in the Urban Landscape. In: Journal of Urban Design 9 (3), 311–333.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Rishbeth C, Powella M (2013): Place Attachment and Memory: Landscapes of Belonging as Experienced Post-migration. Landscape Research, 38(2), 160–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Shinew K J, Glover T D, Parry D C (2004): Leisure spaces as potential sites for interracial interaction: community gardens in urban areas. Journal of Leisure Research,36: 336–355.Google Scholar
  38. Seeland K, Dübendorfer S, Hansmann R (2009): Making friends in Zurich’s urban forests and parks: The role of public green space for social inclusion of youths from different cultures. Forest Policy and Economics, 11(1), 10–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Stamps S M, Stamps M B (1985): Race, class and leisure activities of urban residents. In: Journal of Leisure Research 17 (1), 40–56.Google Scholar
  40. Stephenson J (2008): The Cultural Values Model: An integrated approach to values in landscapes. Landscape and Urban Planning 84, 127–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Stodolska M (2000): Looking beyond the invisible: Can research on leisure of ethnic and racial miniorities contribute to leisure theory? In: Journal of Leisure Research 32 (1), 156–160.Google Scholar
  42. Stodolska M, Livengood J S (2006): The influence of religion on the leisure behavior of immigrant Muslims in the United States. In: Journal of Leisure Research 38 (3), 293–320.Google Scholar
  43. Tschernokoshewa E (2005): Geschichten vom hybriden Leben: Begriffe und Erfahrungswege. In: Tschernokoshewa E, Jurić Pahor M (eds): Auf der Suche nach hybriden Lebensgeschichten. Theorie – Feldforschung – Praxis. Münster, 9–42.Google Scholar
  44. Tuan Y F (1974): Topophilia: a study of environmental perception, attitudes and values. Englewood Cliffs.Google Scholar
  45. Ueda H (2013): The Concept of Landscape in Japan. In: Bruns, D.; Kühne, O. (Hrsg.): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Schwerin, 115–132.Google Scholar
  46. Wypijewski J (1999): Painting by numbers. Komar and Melamid’s scientific guide to art. Berkeley.Google Scholar
  47. Zube E H, Pitt D G (1981): Cross-cultural perceptions of scenic and heritage landscapes. In: Landscape Planning 8 (1), 69–87.Google Scholar
  48. Bruns D (2013): Landschaft, ein internationaler Begriff? In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano Verlag, Schwerin, pp 153–170Google Scholar
  49. Council of Europe (2000): European Landscape Convention. StrasbourgGoogle Scholar
  50. Daniels S, Cosgrove D (1988): Introduction: iconography and landscape. In: Cosgrove D, Daniels S (eds): The iconography of landscape. Essays on the symbolic representation, design and use of environments. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 1–10Google Scholar
  51. Drexler D (2013): Die Wahrnehmung der Landschaft – ein Blick auf das englische, französische und ungarische Landschaftsverständnis. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 37–54Google Scholar
  52. Fabos J, Caswell S (1977): Composite Landscape Assessment. Research Bulletin Number 637. Unversity of Massachusetts, Amherst, MAGoogle Scholar
  53. Franke U (2013): Romantische Landschaften – das Beispiel Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, 255–268Google Scholar
  54. Fuller P (1988): The geography of Mother Nature. In: Cosgrove D, Daniels S (eds): The iconography of landscape. Essays on the symbolic representation, design and use of environments. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp 11–31Google Scholar
  55. Gailing L (2013): Die Landschaft in der Raumordnung In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 287–304.Google Scholar
  56. Glasersfeld E (2001): Kleine Geschichte des Konstruktivismus. In: Müller A, Müller K H, Stadler F (eds): Konstruktivismus und Kognitionswissenschaft. Kulturelle Wurzeln und Ergebnisse. Springer, Wien/ New York, pp 53–62Google Scholar
  57. Groß M (2006): Natur. Transcript, BielefeldCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Hard G (1969): Das Wort Landschaft und sein semantischer Hof. Zur Methode und Ergebnis eines linguistischen Tests. In: Bluhm L, Rölleke H: Wirkendes Wort. vol 19, pp 3–14Google Scholar
  59. Hartz A (2013): Zum Umgang mit Landschaft in der räumlichen Planung. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 269–286Google Scholar
  60. Hauser S (2013): Der Landschaftsbegriff in Landschaftsplanung und Architektur. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 209–220Google Scholar
  61. Ipsen D (2006): Ort und Landschaft. Springer, WiesbadenGoogle Scholar
  62. Kazig R (2013): Landschaft mit allen Sinnen – Zum Wert des Atmosphärenbegriffs für die Landschaftsforschung. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 221–234Google Scholar
  63. Kost S (2013): Landschaftsgenese und Mentalität als kulturelles Muster. Das Landschaftsverständnis in den Niederlanden. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 55–70Google Scholar
  64. Kučan A (1997): The modern social conception of Slovene space. LjubljanaGoogle Scholar
  65. Kühne O (2008): Distinktion – Macht – Landschaft. Zur sozialen Definition von Landschaft. Springer, WiesbadenGoogle Scholar
  66. Kühne O (2013a): Landschaft zwischen Objekthaftigkeit und Konstruktion – Überlegungen zur inversen Landschaft. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 181–194Google Scholar
  67. Kühne O (2013b): Landschaftstheorie und Landschaftspraxis. Eine Einführung aus sozialkonstruktivistischer Perspektive. Springer VS, WiesbadenCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Kühne O, Spellerberg A (2010): Heimat und Heimatbewusstsein in Zeiten erhöhter Flexibilitätsanforderungen. Empirische Untersuchungen im Saarland. Springer, WiesbadenCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Mels T (2013): Emplacing Landscape in Sweden. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 71–82Google Scholar
  70. McHarg I (1969): Design with Nature. Garden City. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  71. Passoth JH (2006): Moderne, Postmoderne, Amoderne. Natur und Gesellschaft bei Bruno Latour. In: Peuker B, Voss M (eds): Verschwindet die Natur? Die Akteur-Netzwerk-Theorie in der umweltsoziologischen Diskussion. Transcript, Bielefeld, pp 37–52Google Scholar
  72. Prominski M (2013): Landschaft in der Gestaltung. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 305–322Google Scholar
  73. Sailer U (2013): Kulturlandschaften und ihre raumordnerischen Implikationen – Zum Planerforum der Landesarbeitsgemeinschaft Hessen/Rheinland-Pfalz/Saarland der Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL). In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 171–180Google Scholar
  74. Schenk W (2013): Landschaft als zweifache sekundäre Bildung – historische Aspekte im aktuellen Gebrauch von Landschaft im deutschsprachigen Raum, namentlich in der Geographie. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 23–36Google Scholar
  75. Schönwald A (2013): Die soziale Konstruktion ‚besonderer‘ Landschaften. Überlegungen zu Stadt und Wildnis. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 195–208Google Scholar
  76. Seel M (1996): Eine Ästhetik der Natur. Suhrkamp, FrankfurtGoogle Scholar
  77. Sieferle R P (1999): Die Transformation der Landschaft. In: Ludwigforum für Internationale Kunst (ed): Natural Reality. Künstlerische Positionen zwischen Natur und Kunst. Daco Verlag, Stuttgart, pp 148–159Google Scholar
  78. Soja E W (2005): Borders Unbound. Globalization, Regionalism, and the Postmetropolitan Transition. In: Houtum H, Kramsch O, Zierhofer W (eds): B/ordering Space. Ashgate Publishing, Hants, Burlington, pp 33–46Google Scholar
  79. Stakelbeck F, Weber, F (2013): Almen als alpine Sehnsuchtslandschaften: Aktuelle Landschaftskonstruktionen im Tourismusmarketing am Beispiel des Salzburger Landes. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds.): Landschaften. Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Schwerin, Oceano Verlag, pp 235–252.Google Scholar
  80. Lorberg F (2010): Wahrnehmungspsychologie und Landschaft http://kobra.bibliothek.uni-kassel.de/bitstream/urn:nbn:de:hebis:34–2010093034668/5/LorbergWahrnehmungspsychologieUnd-Landschaft.pdf (zuletzt abgerufen am 15.06.2012)
  81. Swanwick C (2006): The Role of Landscape Character Assessment in ‘Farming, Forestry and the National Heritage – Towards a more Integrated Future’. In: Davison R, Galbraith C (eds): The Stationery Office. EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  82. Ueda H (2013): The Concept of Landscape in Japan. In: Bruns D, Kühne O (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 115–132Google Scholar
  83. Zhang K, Zhao J, Bruns D (2013): Landschaftsbegriffe in China. In: edrgxBruns D, Kühne Oedrgx (eds): Landschaften: Theorie, Praxis und internationale Bezüge. Oceano-Verlag, Schwerin, pp 133–152Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diedrich Bruns
    • 1
  • Olaf Kühne
    • 2
  • Antje Schönwald
    • 3
  • Simone Theile
    • 4
  1. 1.Kassel UniversityKasselGermany
  2. 2.University of Weihenstephan-TriesdorfFreisingGermany
  3. 3.University of SaarlandSaarbrückenGermany
  4. 4.Kassel UniversityKasselGermany

Personalised recommendations