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European mayors and councillors: Similarities and differences

Chapter
Part of the Urban and Regional Research International book series (URI, volume 14)

Abstract

Why compare European mayors and councillors? It can be argued that the Mayor and the local council are the two most important organs of local government. Mayors are the most visible citizens that represent their towns outwardly. Their political significance usually stretches far beyond their formal competencies. Directly elected mayors, in particular, have strong and unchallenged legitimacy. Councils are usually endowed with the authority to decide on municipal budgets, local development plans, municipal property and to pass by-laws. This text, however, does not examine councils as collective entities.

Keywords

Local Politics Local Councillor Executive Board High Office Direct Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyPhilosophical Faculty Palacky University OlomoucOlomoucCzech Republic

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