Isoenzymes in Melanoma

  • H. Pandov
  • A. Dikov
Conference paper

Abstract

Studies on enzyme systems in human and experimental melanomas have been the subject of numerous papers [4, 5, 7, 11, 14, 17, 18]. Most common are the communications on studies of enzyme systems related to the synthesis of melanin and its metabolism in normal melanocytes and in melanoma cells [1, 3, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 20, 22, 23]. In contrast to this large number of communications on the total enzyme activity of melanoma cells, only recently have reports appeared on the determination of isoenzyme fractions for individual enzymes [16, 19].

Keywords

Testosterone Catechol Dinucleotide Nicotinamide Dopa 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Pandov
    • 1
  • A. Dikov
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryOncological Research InstituteSofiaBulgaria

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