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Isoenzymes in Melanoma

  • H. Pandov
  • A. Dikov
Conference paper

Abstract

Studies on enzyme systems in human and experimental melanomas have been the subject of numerous papers [4, 5, 7, 11, 14, 17, 18]. Most common are the communications on studies of enzyme systems related to the synthesis of melanin and its metabolism in normal melanocytes and in melanoma cells [1, 3, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 20, 22, 23]. In contrast to this large number of communications on the total enzyme activity of melanoma cells, only recently have reports appeared on the determination of isoenzyme fractions for individual enzymes [16, 19].

Keywords

Pigment Cell Tyrosinase Activity Mouse Melanoma Isoenzyme Pattern Amelanotic Melanoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Pandov
    • 1
  • A. Dikov
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryOncological Research InstituteSofiaBulgaria

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