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The Concepts of Home Range and Homing in Stream Fishes

With a Discussion of Sensory Implications
  • Gerald E. Gunning
Part of the Ergebnisse der Biologie / Advances in Biology book series (ERGBIOL, volume 26)

Abstract

Home range may be defined as the area over which an animal normally travels. Gerking (1950, 1953) found that longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis)1, rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), and green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) in two Indiana streams moved about very little from one year to the next. These sunfishes were estimated to have remained within a home range of 100–200 linear feet of stream. The home ranges of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) were believed to range from 200–400 linear feet of stream. In a later paper, Gerking (1959) listed 33 species of fishes which exhibit restricted movement or occupy home ranges.

Keywords

Home Range Stream Segment Stream Fish Smallmouth Bass Homing Ability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. American Fisheries Society, Committee on Names of Fishes. A list of common and scientific names of fishes from the United States and Canada. Special Publication No. 2, 102 p. (1960).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag OHG. Berlin · Göttingen · Heidelberg 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald E. Gunning
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA

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