The Architecture of the Mental Lexicon

  • Johannes Engelkamp
  • Ralf Rummer

Abstract

The original subject of research on the mental lexicon is the subjective representation of word meanings. Just as in linguistics words are allocated their meanings in the lexicon, words were allocated a mental representation in the psychology of the 1970’s. This position could, however, not be maintained. Assumptions regarding representation have become increasingly differentiated, so that now the mental lexicon must be understood as a part of the whole cognitive architecture.

Keywords

Attenuation Dementia Prefix Aphasia Marin 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johannes Engelkamp
  • Ralf Rummer

There are no affiliations available

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