Saure antipyretische Analgetika

  • Herman Hans Waldvogel

Zusammenfassung

Das chemische Grundgerüst der Salizylsäure besteht aus einem Benzolring mit einer Hydroxylgruppe sowie einer Carboxylgruppe (Phenolcarbonsäure bzw. Hydroxyben- zoesäure), wobei die Orthoform (Salizylsäure) der Hydroxylgruppe, nicht aber die Meta- und Paraformen, wirksam sind. Die Salze und Ester der Salizylsäure heißen Sa- lizylate. Derivate der Salizylsäure werden eingesetzt als
  1. 1

    Zeilschädigend wirkende Substanzen (z. B. das obsolete Wintergrünöl, eine Art frühes „Naturaspirin“; das bakteriostatisch wirkende Tuberkulosemittel PAS; die Zellgifte Sulfasalazin und Mesalamin, die zur Eindämmung chronischer proliferativer Darmentzündungen eingesetzt werden);

     
  2. 2

    saure antipyretische Analgetika, die entweder ein Prodrug für Salizylsäure (Salsa- lat) oder Salizylamid (Ethenzamid, Sulfasalazin) darstellen.

     

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1.7 Sulfoanilide

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herman Hans Waldvogel
    • 1
  1. 1.La ForestièreSt. Paul en ChablaisFrankreich

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