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Etiology

  • F. X. Bosch
Part of the UICC International Union Against Cancer book series (UICCI)

Abstract

The epidemiologic evidence for the etiology of cancer falls into two major categories: the first, which could be denoted circumstantial, is derived from the interpretation of observed differences in sex, age, socioeconomic, and geographic patterns, including changes in risk on migration and over time, as well as correlations of cancer risk with other variables (e. g., population density, air pollution, etc.). While the same set of observations may be interpreted in more than one way, any theory as to cause must be consistent with the observed distribution, otherwise it is wrong or incomplete. The second category of evidence comes from analytical studies specifically designed to test hypotheses suggested by the first category. Such investigations are usually in the form of case-control, cohort, or intervention studies.

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Bile Duct Cancer Asbestos Fiber Dyskeratosis Congenita Autosomal Recessive Trait 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Further reading

  1. Armijo Rojas R (ed) (1986) Epidemiologia del Cancer. Inter-médica editorial, Buenos AiresGoogle Scholar
  2. Coleman MP (ed) (1990) New cancers after medical treatment. Oxford University Press, Oxford (in press)Google Scholar
  3. Doll R, Peto R (1981) The causes of cancer. Oxford University Press, Oxford, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Higginson J, Muir CS, Muñoz N, Sheridon M (eds) (1990) The epidemiology and causes of human cancer. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom (in press)Google Scholar
  5. IARC 1987 Monographs on the evaluation of the carcinogenic risk of chemicals to humans, Supplement 7 International Agency for Research on Cancer LyonGoogle Scholar
  6. Muñoz N, Bosch FX, Jensen OM (1989) Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer (IARC Scientific Publications No 94), International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  7. IARC (1987) Monographs on the evaluation of the carcinogenic risk of chemicals to humans, Supplement 7, International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  8. Muñoz N, Bosch FX, Jensen OM (1989) Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer (IARC Scientific Publications No 94), International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  9. Tomatis L (ed) (1990) Cancer: causes, occurrence and control. (IARC Scientific Publications No 100), International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  10. Vessey MP, Gray M (eds) (1985) Cancer risks and prevention. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. X. Bosch

There are no affiliations available

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