Abstract

Interstitial pneumonitis is usually defined as a nonbacterial, nonfungal pneumonitis. The disease process involves mostly the pulmonary interstitium in the form of mononuclear cell infiltration and fluid accumulation with a relative sparing of air spaces. Because of this, there is only little productive cough, and it may be difficult to establish the diagnosis on the basis of sputum cultures or bronchoalveolar lavage. Radiographically, the process can be localized or diffuse with a prominent interstitial pattern. Although the clinical picture with shortness of breath, hypoxemia, and radiographic findings is rather typical, a definitive diagnosis often requires an open lung biopsy.

Keywords

Lymphoma Corticosteroid Pneumonia Anemia Fractionation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Deeg

There are no affiliations available

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