Change of regional cerebral hemoglobin saturation (rSO2) in children undergoing corrective cardiac surgery of congenital heart disease by means of high-flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)

  • H. Abdul-Khaliq
  • T. Weipert
  • V. Alexi-Meskishvili
  • Y. Weng
  • R. Hetzer
  • P. E. Lange
Conference paper

Abstract

Neuropsychological morbidity following cardiac surgery of congenital heart disease (CHD) — considered to be most likely due to alterations of cerebral oxygenation and hemodynamics — could possibly be in part prevented by early detection by means of continuous non-invasive monitoring during and after cardiac surgery (8, 11, 12). However, determination of capillary blood saturation is limited during non-pulsatile CPB. Continuous monitoring of regional cerebral blood saturation (rSO2) by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may provide qualitative information on cerebral oxygen supply and consumption, since a significant correlation was found between the spectroscopic measurement of rSO2 and the invasive (1) and noninvasive (14) determination of cerebral venous blood saturation in the jugular bulb. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationship between the change in rSO2 and other hemodynamic parameters during the different stages of CPB in a heterogeneous group of infants and children undergoing corrective and palliative cardiac surgery by means of high flow CPB.

Keywords

Catheter Dioxide 

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Abdul-Khaliq
    • 1
  • T. Weipert
    • 1
  • V. Alexi-Meskishvili
    • 2
  • Y. Weng
    • 2
  • R. Hetzer
    • 2
  • P. E. Lange
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung für Angeborene Herzfehler und KinderkardiologieDeutsches Herzzentrum BerlinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Abteilung für Herz, Thorax- und GefäßchirurgieDeutsches Herzzentrum BerlinBerlinGermany

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