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Planar Map Generation by Parallel Binary Fission/Fusion Grammars

  • Jack W. Carlyle
  • Sheila A. Greibach
  • Azaria Paz

Abstract

A new class of formal grammatical systems, based upon simultaneous (parallel) rewriting of symbols in strings, was introduced by A. Lindenmayer [1], intended as a theoretical model for development of filamentous biological organisms, e.g., by cell-division. Lindenmayer’s contributions have stimulated widespread interest and research in theoretical models for parallel generation in computer science as well as in biology. Initial advances pertained to string-based systems, i.e., linear or one-dimensional structures, but were followed by numerous proposals for addressing the difficult problem of generalization to nonlinear systems, capable of modeling development in two- or three-dimensional organisms or complex data structures. Some references to multi-dimensional or graph generation are given here [2,3,4,6,7,8,9,10,12,13,14,17], with emphasis on those relating to parallel generation, but space permits us only limited coverage, which may be augmented by consulting a recent comprehensive bibliography [16].

Keywords

Span Tree Hamiltonian Path Parallel Generation Logarithmic Time Binary Fission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack W. Carlyle
    • 1
  • Sheila A. Greibach
    • 1
  • Azaria Paz
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science Dept.University of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Computer Science Dept.Technion-I.I.T.HaifaIsrael

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