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Abstract

Starch is deposited by plants in the form of organised structures, called starch granules. They have a peculiar shape, which is characteristic for the species. As starch granules are products of living particles (amyloplasts), these plastids must have a characteristic hereditary structure. At the same time, growth and development of starch granules are subject to the physiological condition of the cell in which they are formed. As always there is interaction between genetical predisposition and environment.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag oHG. Berlin · Göttingen · Heidelberg 1958

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. P. Badenhuizen

There are no affiliations available

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