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Spatial Models of Tuna Dynamics in the Western Pacific: Is International Management Necessary?

  • Ray Hilborn
Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 72)

Abstract

Two explicit spatial models are presented to analyze the interaction between tuna fisheries in adjacent jurisdictions. Given the movements of skipjack tuna, and the large EEZ size of Western Pacific countries, there would appear to be little effect of” skipjack fisheries outside of the EEZ on the catch inside the EEZ of most countries. This is less true for yellowfin tuna which live longer. The models presented, and the data and analysis required to estimate parameters necessary for these models, provides a quantitative framework for the analysis of interaction and the need for international catch regulation.

Keywords

Movement Rate Fishing Effort Catch Rate Yellowfin Tuna Harvest Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray Hilborn
    • 1
  1. 1.Tuna and Billfish Assessment ProgrammeSouth Pacific CommissionNoumea Cedex, New CaledoniaFrance

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