Confidentiality Problems in the Federal Republic of Germany

  • G. Wagner
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Medical Informatics book series (LNMED, volume 25)

Abstract

In almost all western democracies the idea has gained more and more ground during the last twenty years that the citizen’s personal data are in need of increased protection in view of the practically unlimited possibilities offered by the computer in setting up and working with the most extensive databases. This development also has considerable impact on research inasmuch as the latter depends upon work with personal data. The fact that the understanding of jurists of the scope and necessity of data protection frequently differs greatly from the requirements of the medical researcher (e.g., the epidemiologist) has in the past led to innumerable discussions, reflected in unpleasant articles in the press which, among other things, spoke about “giant data collections at the cost of the patient”, about “ferocious epidemiologists” and of “cancer patients whose data was to be turned into cash” (13). One of the rare examples to the contrary is the article in the New Statesman of 3 March 1967 with the caustic title “To Hell with Medical Secrecy”.

Keywords

Europe Assure 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Bundesärztekammer: Thesenpapier — Empfehlung zur Beachtung der ärztlichen Schweigepflicht bei der Verarbeitung personenbezogener Daten in der ärztlichen Berufsausübung. (Als Manuskript gedruckt).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft: (Unterkommission Datenschutz der Senatskommission für empirische Sozialforschung): Vorschlag zur Novellierung des Bundesdatenschutzgesetzes (BDSG) vom 1. Sept. 1982. (Als Manuskript gedruckt).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Glazebrook, P.R.: Medical Confidences, Research and the Law. In E.D. Acheson (Edit.): Record Linkage in Medicine, pp. 323–332. Edinburgh and London: Livingstone 1968Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kilian, W.: Rechtsfragen der medizinischen Forschung mit Patientendaten. Datenschutz und Forschungsfreiheit im Konflikt. Beiträge zur juristischen Informatik, Band 9. Darmstadt: S. Toeche- Mittler Verlag 1983.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kilian, W., Porth, A.J. (Hrsg.): Juristische Probleme der Datenverarbeitung in der Medizin. Med. Informatik und Statistik, Band 12. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer 1979.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Reichertz, P.L.: Kontextabhängigkeit medizinischer Informationen. In P.L. Reichertz, W. Kilian (7), S. 204–210.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Reichertz, P.L., Kilian, W. (Hrsg.): Arztgeheimnis-Datenbanken- Datenschutz. Med. Informatik und Statistik, Band 38. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer 1982.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Smith, A.Z.: Memoirs of an epidemiologist. New York: Augur Press 2002.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Steinmüller, W.: Der Schutz „medizinischer “Daten: Terminologische, rechtliche und organisatorische Aspekte; sowie ein Vorschlag zur gesetzlichen Regelung des Datenschutzes bei Forschung und Planung. In W. Kilian und A.J. Porth (5), S. 1 35–148.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Überla, K., Zeiler, J. (Hrsg.): Datenschutz und Wissenschaftsadministration im Gesundheitsbereich. bga-Schriften Nr. 5/83. München: MMW Medizin Verlag 1983.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Wagner, G.: Krebsregister und Datenschutz. In W. Kilian und A.J. Porth(5), S. 71–77.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Wagner, G.: Datenschutz und Onkologie. In P.L. Reichertz und W. Kilian (7), S. 117–126.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Wagner, G.: Krebsregister: notwendig, wenn auch nicht unproblematisch. Klinikarzt 13 (1984), S. 753–762.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Wissenschaftsrat: Stellungnahme zu Forschung und Datenschutz vom 5. Nov., 1982 (Typescript).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Research CenterHeidelbergGermany

Personalised recommendations