Nosocomial Infections in Newborn Intensive Care Units

  • W. B. Kedzia
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Medical Informatics book series (LNMED, volume 25)

Abstract

The study was performed in the Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units /NICU’s/ of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Poznan. Admission to the NICU’s was reserved for critically ill neonates and for underweight infants. The samples were collected from inanimate objects, from hospital personnel and newborns. All bacterial strains were isolated, identified and typing by serological, pyocine and bacteriophage methods. Serious hospital infections in newborn babies were caused by K. pneumoniae, P.aeruginosa, E.coli and S.aureus. There were only sporadically Enterobacter, streptococci group A and B, Flavobacteria and S.marcescens infections. Three outbreaks of epidemics have been observed. The study was performed in the Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units /NICU’s/ of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Poznan. Admission to the NICU’s was reserved for critically ill neonates and for underweight infants. The samples were collected from inanimate objects, from hospital personnel and newborns. All bacterial strains were isolated, identified and typing by serological, pyocine and bacteriophage methods. Serious hospital infections in newborn babies were caused by K. pneumoniae, P.aeruginosa, E.coli and S.aureus. There were only sporadically Enterobacter, streptococci group A and B, Flavobacteria and S.marcescens infections. Three outbreaks of epidemics have been observed. Two of them were caused by P, aeruginosa and one epidemic by K. pneumoniae. Hospital strains have shown typically bacteriophage or pyocine pattern and have also been isolated in hospital environment, from skin of hands of the personnel and from the equipment. 59 newborns suffered from pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis and 78 suffered minor infections. The K.pneumoniae outbreak was caused by the strain multiply-resistant to antibiotics. The epidemic strain was resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, cephalotin, gentamycin, kanamycin and tobramycin. One of the epidemic strains of P.aeruginosa was resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics but the second epidemic strain of Pseudomonas was sensitive to aminoglycoside antibiotics.

Keywords

Europe Pneumonia Pseudomonas Meningitis Ampicillin 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. B. Kedzia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical MicrobiologyUniversity School of MedicinePoznańPoland

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