Sampled Aperture Techniques for High Resolution Ultrasound Tomography

  • Steven A. Johnson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Medical Informatics book series (LNMED, volume 17)

Abstract

This paper reviews two new imaging techniques which depend upon sampling the ultrasound pressure signal at many places on an aperture. The predicted performance of these new methods is compared with well known and standard ultrasound techniques such as those found in focused piston transducer B-scan systems and phased array imaging systems. These new methods show promise for improved resolution and qualitative tissue characterization. The first of these techniques, synthetic focusing, is analogous to the seismic imaging methods known as seismic migration used in geophysical exploration for petroleum. The relationship of this method to acoustical holography will be discussed. The second sampled aperture technique, diffraction tomography, is a first-order perturbation method for finding inverse solutions of the wave equation in the interior of a region from measurements on its boundary. The method holds promise for reconstructing ultrasonic refractive index, attenuation, and specific impedance. Both new methods are capable of producing images with resolution of about one wavelength.

Keywords

Migration Attenuation Petroleum Convolution Sine 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven A. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BioengineeringUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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