Co-Ordinated Decentralised Computer Systems

  • N. Harris
  • C. Horn
  • S. Baker
  • P. Duggan
  • D. Lyons
  • B. Tangney
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Medical Informatics book series (LNMED, volume 16)

Abstract

Due to the decreasing cost of computer hardware the trend in computer development has been away from the large centralised computer systems and towards a large number of autonomous microcomputer systems. This development has had many benefits not least the local departmental control over the operation of the system and also the increase in availability. But it also has its disadvantages, the main ones being the difficulty in exchanging information between autonomous systems and secondly the inability to share underutilised and expensive resources. Local networks provide a high speed communication facility between computers within a radius on one or two kilometres. The communication media is usually coaxial cable and the transfer speed is comparable with disk transfer rates. The local network provides the ability to exchange information rapidly and easily and also the ability to share resources. The next stage in the development is to weld the loosely connected systems into a coordinated decentralised computer system by a distributed operating system. This paper discusses a project in this area.

Keywords

Europe Tral Decis Poss Hine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Harris
    • 1
  • C. Horn
    • 1
  • S. Baker
    • 1
  • P. Duggan
    • 1
  • D. Lyons
    • 1
  • B. Tangney
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceTrinity College, University of DublinDublin 2Ireland

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