The Cybernetics of Human Physical Performance

  • J. T. Corlett
  • T. W. Calvert
  • E. W. Banister

Abstract

In this paper the relation is studied between a system input (time function of physical training) and a system output (corresponding time function of maximal physical performance). The optimal control theory is applied to find the function of training which leads to maximal physical performance at some time in the future.

Keywords

Fatigue Bilirubin 

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References

  1. 1.
    P. O. Astrand and K. Rodahl, Textbook of Work Physiology (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1970).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    E. W. Banister, T. W. Calvert, M. V. Savage and T. Bach, “A systems model for athletic performance” Aust. J. Sports Med. 7, 57–61 (1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    T. W. Calvert, E. W. Banister, M. V. Savage and T. Bach, “A systems model of the effects of training on physical performanne” IEEE Trans. on Systems, Man and Cybernetics SMC-6, 94–102 (February 1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. W. Calvert and E. W. Banister, “The effects of training on fitness, fatigue and performance in young runners—a computer model” Proc. VII Symposium on Paediatric Work Physiology 1975 (to be published by Penguin Books).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    J. T. Corlett, “A systems model of physical training and athletic performance” M.Sc. (Kines) Thesis (Simon Fraser University, 1976).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The World Organisation of General Systems and Cybernetics 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. T. Corlett
    • 1
  • T. W. Calvert
    • 1
  • E. W. Banister
    • 1
  1. 1.Kinesiology DepartmentSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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