Stellar Clusters

  • H. Shapley
Part of the Handbuch der Astrophysik book series (volume 5/2)

Abstract

We designate as star clusters those groupings of stars in which the members are known to be gravitationally associated or may be assumed from their apparent positions relative to each other to constitute distinct physical organizations. Such a category includes both the typical globular systems and the more numerous and less well defined open clusters which range, for instance, from the Hyades to the fairly compact system of Messier 11.

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Copyright information

© Julius Springer in Berlin 1933

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Shapley
    • 1
  1. 1.CambridgeUSA

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