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Color Adaptation: Sensitivity, Contrast, After-images

  • Dorothea Jameson
  • Leo M. Hurvich
Part of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology book series (SENSORY, volume 7 / 4)

Abstract

This chapter deals with the problems of chromatic adaptation and its mechanisms. In our analysis of chromatic adaptation and its use to reveal specific properties of the mechanism of color vision, we shall discuss sensitivity changes, contrast effects and after-images. Despite the intrinsic interest of each of these topics, we are not here concerned with a detailed and comprehensive description of the multiplicity of visual effects conventionally grouped under the separate rubrics, contrast, after-images, etc.

Keywords

Test Stimulus Spectral Distribution Color Vision Visual Pigment Color Constancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, Berlin · Heidelberg 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothea Jameson
    • 1
  • Leo M. Hurvich
    • 1
  1. 1.PhiladelphiaUSA

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